Cinema-Scoping

Cinema-Scoping

This Week on Turner Classic Movies - 8/4 - 8/10

August is devoted to Turner Classic Movie’s Summer Under the Stars festival in which every day – that’s a 24-hour day - is devoted to a single star.  So, it’s a feast or famine situation.  If you love the actor or actress being focused on, then you’re in hog heaven for the entire day and evening.  If not…well there’s always the DVD player to rely on.

“Goes” Beneath its Stars

Rob Reiner’s And So It Goes is the sort of movie that, when someone asks you how it was, you’re likely to say, “It was OK.”  Not god-awful and certainly not good, it’s the sort of film that you forget by the time you’ve walked to your car in the parking lot after the final credits roll.  Woefully predictable, chockfull of clichés and flatly executed, even fans of it

Koplinski: Can dismal summer movie season be saved?

There’s a great deal of handwringing going on in Hollywood at the moment, and it’s your fault.  Yep, the bean-counters in Tinsel Town are worried and wondering why you’re not spending more of your hard-earned money to see the summer movies they’ve produced. 

Intelligence a casualty in inane 'Sex Tape'

We all have those days — the ones where we’re just not with it, a bit groggy, where we stumble through knowing we’re not giving 100 percent and not really caring, simply killing time until we can crawl back into bed and hopefully get a fresh start the next morning.  In watching Jake Kasdan’s dismal Sex Tape, I was under the impression that many of its key players were having a ser

Chuck Koplinski: In appreciation of James Garner

Movie stars aren’t like you and I. That’s not to say they’re better than us morally and some, believe it or not, are quite normal looking once their make up is taken away and normal lighting is applied.  However, they do have a magical quality about them that appears once they’re in front of a camera.

'Child' a realistic look at a thorny issue

Some have labeled Gillian Robespierre’s Obvious Child as an “abortion comedy.”  This is a bit of lazy journalism and something of a misnomer as the film is not as flippant as this description would suggest.  No, it proves refreshing in the way it takes a pragmatic look at this thorny situation from the point of view of a woman who, despite foolishly getting herself

“Begin Again” a cure for summertime movie blues

A tonic for the steady stream of vacuous movies Hollywood has foisted on us this summer John Carney’s Begin Again is a grounded, delightful, human tale buoyed by infectious yet meaningful pop music and dynamic performances from its strong cast.  Unabashedly romantic, the film manages to give us a story that’s manipulative to the core yet somehow present it with such sincerity that