Take Care: All About Your Health

Take Care: All About Your Health

Vanishing health insurance and the middle class

If you’re a middle-wage earner feeling squeezed by the cost of health insurance these days, you’re not alone.

A report being released today as part of national Cover the Uninsured Week March 14-20 contends America’s middle class is shouldering the brunt of the health insurance crisis.

When aging and driving don't mix

Isn’t it cool that Grandma is still driving at her age?  Maybe not, according to the American Medical Association.

Having a driver’s license typically means independence to the elderly, but older drivers are involved in more vehicle crashes, and are more likely to die from accident-related injuries than their younger counterparts, according to the AMA.

Sleepless in Illinois

Are money problems, job problems, love problems and who knows what other stressors keeping you awake at night? 

Some 30-40 percent of adults have trouble sleeping now and then, and older people and women experiencing menopause, menstruation or pregnancy can be plagued by insomnia the most, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

Staying healthy ups chance of good sex life at mid-life and beyond

Want to stay sexually active as you age, and enjoy it, too? Take good care of your health.

That was one of the findings made by University of Chicago researchers in a study published Tuesday in British Medical Journal.

Also concluded: Men remain sexually active and interested in sex longer than women, but lose more years of their sexually active life due to poor health.
 
Read about it on this government health news site:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_96195.html

Another reason to consider flu shots for kids

Something to consider when the next flu season approaches in the fall: New research suggests immunizing children against seasonal influenza  can significantly protect the unvaccinated members in your community.

Teen-age girls, women and AIDS

Hey parents, have you talked to your daughters about the risk of HIV/AIDS?

Teen-age girls and women currently account for a quarter of all new HIV/AIDS cases being diagnosed, and oftentimes the source of the infection was heterosexual contact, according to the latest government statistics.

The Office on Women’s Health, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, hopes to raise awareness of the increasing impact of HIV/AIDS on women and teen-age girls through National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day today.

Processed meats linked with more heart disease and diabetes

Do you avoid steak and hamburgers for your health’s sake, but prefer your pancakes and pizza with sausage?

Harvard researchers have found it’s the processed meats like the kind we often eat for breakfast and pile on our sub sandwiches that hurt our hearts, not unprocessed red meat.

Processed meats include any that have been smoked, salted, cured or preserved with chemicals — such as bacon, sausage, hot dogs and all processed deli or lunch meats.

Spring break protection for your skin

Heading someplace warm for spring break?

The Skin Cancer Foundation warns it's important to be careful about protecting your skin from ultraviolet radiation, especially in light of new research showing UV radiation is the source of most mutations found in melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Foods involved in latest salmonella scare

Here's where to find the extensive list of foods that are subject to the Salmonella Tennessee recall:   www.foodsafety.gov.

Everything on the list contains hydrolyzed vegetable protein (a common ingredient used as a flavor enhancer) that came from one manufacturer, Las Vegas-based Basic Food Flavors Inc.  A customer reported finding Salmonella Tennessee in one production lot of HVP.

If you eat a lot of processed foods, you’re probably eating HVP. It’s in many snack foods, salad dressings, soups, sauces, gravies, hot dogs and dips.

Debating health care reform

 Here’s a chance to hear two national experts debate health care reform Tuesday (March 9)  on the University of Illinois campus.

This first program of the Lincoln-Douglas Debate Series will be held from 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday in Deloitte Auditorium at the Business Instructional Facility, 514 Gregory Drive, Champaign.

It’s free and open to the public, and a question and answer session will follow.