A typical October "feel" across the Midwest...

Across the Corn Belt, dry weather favors a limited return to fieldwork, following a stormy spell. Winter wheat across the eastern Corn Belt is benefiting from recent topsoil moisture improvements, but additional precipitation will be needed to ensure proper crop establishment.

On the Plains, summer crop harvesting and late-season winter wheat planting activities are proceeding under a dry weather regime and rapidly rebounding temperatures. However, dry conditions are stressing the emerging winter wheat crop across portions of the central and southern Plains.

In the South, dry but cooler weather is promoting summer crop harvesting and other fieldwork. Despite recent showers, some producers continue to await additional moisture before planting winter grains.

In the West, showers continue in northwestern California and the Pacific Northwest. Elsewhere, autumn fieldwork—including cotton harvesting in California and the Desert Southwest—is advancing under favorable conditions.

Looking ahead, a disturbance will produce wet weather from the Pacific Coast States into central and northern portions of the Great Basin and Rockies, with the heaviest precipitation expected in northern California and the Pacific Northwest.

Mostly dry, increasingly warm conditions will prevail across the rest of the nation, although a cold front will bring a spell of chilly weather to the northern and central Plains and Northeast.

There are indications that a storm may form over the southern or eastern U.S. next week, although it is too early to pinpoint the exact evolution and impact of this system.

The 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to above-normal temperatures nationwide, except for cooler-than-normal weather in the Atlantic and Gulf Coast States. Meanwhile, near- to below-normal precipitation across the majority of the U.S. will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions in the Atlantic coastal plain and the Pacific Northwest. 

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