Cool, damp weather covers much of the Corn Belt

Cool, damp weather covers much of the Corn Belt

In the Corn Belt, a pesky storm continues to limit fieldwork due to cool, humid weather and scattered showers. By September 25, the soybean harvest was just 3% complete in Indiana and had not yet begun in Ohio—11 points behind the 5-year average in both states.

On the Plains, unseasonably warm weather favors fieldwork and summer crop maturation. On the southern Plains, however, many producers are awaiting additional rain before planting winter wheat. By September 25, planting was just 11% complete in Oklahoma and 14% complete in Texas—20 points behind the 5-year average in both states.

In the South, scattered thunderstorms accompany a warm, humid weather pattern. Harvest activities for crops such as cotton, peanuts, rice, and soybeans continue as conditions permit.

In the West, warm, mostly dry weather continues to promote fieldwork and summer crop maturation. Washington leads the nation with 70% of its intended winter wheat acreage planted by September 25.

A slow-moving storm over the Midwest will drift northeastward into eastern Canada by week’s end. Additional rainfall could reach 1 to 3 inches from the lower Great Lakes region into the Northeast.

Meanwhile, isolated showers and thunderstorms will continue in the southern Atlantic States and across the Deep South. Dry weather will prevail across the remainder of the U.S., except for some showers in the Pacific Northwest.

Persistent warmth will prevail across the northern High Plains and the Northwest. In contrast, very cool air will arrive by week’s end across the Midwest and much of the East. During the weekend, widespread frost can be expected from the Great Lakes region into the Northeast.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to below-normal temperatures along the Pacific Coast and south and east of a line from eastern Texas to Lower Michigan, while warmer-than-normal weather will prevail across the remainder of the U.S. Meanwhile, near- to below-normal precipitation across the majority of the nation will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions in the West (excluding the region’s southern tier).

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