Historic heat wave extends from the Great Plains to the East Coast

Across the Corn Belt, a record-shattering heat wave continues to trim yield prospects for reproductive corn and soybeans across drought-affected southern and eastern portions of the region. In addition, heat is spreading into the upper Midwest, where some corn is beginning to silk and some soybeans have begun to bloom.

On the Plains, relatively cool conditions in Texas contrast with above-normal temperatures farther north. Monday’s high temperatures will exceed 100° on the central High Plains, where the ongoing heat wave continues to stress both rain-fed and irrigated summer crops.

In the South, beneficial showers are providing very localized and limited relief from record-setting heat. On Sunday, all-time records were set or tied in Southeastern locations such as Chattanooga, Tennessee (107°F), and Greenville-Spartanburg, South Carolina (107°). Triple-digit temperatures can be expected again Monday in much of the Southeast, where reproductive summer crops continue to wither.

In the West, more than four dozen large wildfires continue to burn from Arizona and New Mexico northward into Montana. Mostly above-normal temperatures prevail in the West, except along the Pacific Coast.

An historic, early-season heat wave will persist for the remainder of the week in many areas from the central Plains into the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern States. High temperatures will regularly approach, reach, or exceed 100° in the heat-affected regions. In addition, heat will briefly spread across the northern Plains and the upper Midwest.

During the next 5 days, some of the most significant rain will fall in the north-central U.S., where 1- to 3-inch totals may occur. Meanwhile, scattered, locally severe thundershowers will dot the East.

Farther west, the development of monsoon showers may aid wildfire containment efforts in the central Rockies and the Four Corners States.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for hotter-than-normal weather virtually nationwide. Below-normal temperatures will be confined to parts of Florida’s peninsula. Meanwhile, drier-than-normal weather across the majority of the U.S. will contrast with above-normal rainfall in the central Rockies and portions of the Atlantic Coast States.

Comments

News-Gazette.com embraces discussion of both community and world issues. We welcome you to contribute your ideas, opinions and comments, but we ask that you avoid personal attacks, vulgarity and hate speech. We reserve the right to remove any comment at our discretion, and we will block repeat offenders' accounts. To post comments, you must first be a registered user, and your username will appear with any comment you post. Happy posting.

Login or register to post comments