The Weather Front On-Line

The Weather Front On-Line

A cool pattern ahead for the Corn Belt

Across the Corn Belt, dry weather, abundant soil moisture, and near- to below-normal temperatures remain nearly ideal for corn and soybeans. On July 6, nearly one-quarter (24%) of the U.S. soybeans had begun to bloom, while 15% of the corn was Silking. Dry weather also favors soft red winter wheat harvesting.

Near ideal weather across the Corn Belt

Across the Corn Belt, cool, mostly dry weather is nearly ideal for pastures and summer crops, as well as soft red winter wheat harvesting. On July 6, at least half of the pastures were rated in good to excellent condition in every Midwestern State, ranging from 52% in Nebraska to 91% in Wisconsin.

Cooler, drier air overspreading the Corn Belt

Across the Corn Belt, cool, dry, breezy weather prevails across the upper Midwest. Meanwhile, showers and thunderstorms stretch from Michigan to southern Missouri, in conjunction with a cold front. The rain is maintaining abundant moisture reserves for corn and soybeans, but hampering winter wheat harvesting.

Near ideal weather pattern across the Corn Belt

Across the Corn Belt, scattered showers and thunderstorms accompany a push of slightly cooler air. Hot weather lingers, however, across the southern Corn Belt. Overall growing conditions remain mostly favorable for Midwestern corn and soybeans.

Despite a stormy, June, U.S. Corn Fields doing well

Across the Corn Belt, cooler air is arriving, particularly across the upper Midwest. Heat lingers, however, across the eastern Corn Belt. Along the boundary between hot and cool air, showers and thunderstorms stretch from the lower Great Lakes region into Missouri. On June 29, three-quarters of the U.S.

More rain ahead for the Heartland

Across the Corn Belt, a band of scattered showers and thunderstorms—stretching from eastern Nebraska to Indiana—bisects the region. Cooler air is beginning to overspread the upper Midwest, but warm weather is promoting a rapid crop development pace across the remainder of the Corn Belt.

Water-logged fields in parts of Corn Belt

Across the Corn Belt, drier weather has returned to western portions of the region, where 7-day rainfall of 4 to locally more than 12 inches has resulted in major river flooding and water-logged fields. Showers and thunderstorms in the Ohio Valley are improving soil moisture for corn and soybeans.

A wide range of weather across the Corn Belt

Across the Corn Belt, locally heavy showers and thunderstorms are eradicating soil moisture deficits from Iowa into central Michigan but causing local flooding. Sunny, hot weather is accelerating corn and soybean development in southern portions of the Corn Belt.

Warmer weather returns to the Midwest

Across the Corn Belt, a few isolated showers and thunderstorms dot the eastern half of the region. Elsewhere, sunny skies and increasingly warm conditions are accelerating final planting efforts and crop development.

Favorable weather across most of the Corn Belt

Across the Corn Belt, below-normal temperatures prevail. However, dry weather in the northern Corn Belt favors late-season planting efforts, while rain in the southern Corn Belt is boosting soil moisture for summer crops.