All Technology Content

All Technology Content

Yahoo's lagging growth a cause for concern

CHAMPAIGN – To former Motorola employees in Champaign whose livelihoods were saved by Yahoo, the Internet giant looks like a white knight.

But to analysts and investors across the nation, the Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company appears to have tarnished armor.

Agency offers opportunity to "earn" computers

DANVILLE – Gayle Savoree wanted a computer to practice keyboarding skills and get back in the work force.

Now, she not only has a computer, but also a job, thanks to a new nonprofit organization in Danville.

Downtown wireless network goes online

A new, free downtown wireless system in Champaign, connected to the Internet, was officially up and running Friday.

Champaign-based Pavlov Media, which is providing the system as a community service with Go Networks and the city of Champaign, has been testing the network, the sign-on Web site and other details most of this week.

Supercomputer at UI looks like lock

A more than $200 million supercomputer capable of breaking the "petascale" barrier – 1,000 trillion calculations per second – now appears almost certain to land at the University of Illinois.

The National Science Foundation Board on Wednesday recommended that the system be built at the UI under the direction of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. A release from the science foundation put the price tag at $208 million over the next five years. The system would go on line in 2011.

Wi-Fi coming to downtown Champaign

By next week, downtown Champaign should be covered in an invisible wireless net making free Internet access available to almost anyone with a wireless laptop and other mobile devices using the common Wi-Fi standard.

Employees from Champaign-based Pavlov Media, which is installing the system as a community gift and publicity tool; Go Networks, the wireless equipment provider; and the city of Champaign began deploying the necessary hardware Thursday morning.

Courier digitization project

If you've ever gotten seasick scrolling through a roll of microfilm looking for something in an old newspaper, or worse yet, had to flip through dusty, crumbling bound volumes of the real thing, you'll love this.

A project to digitize several decades of the defunct Urbana Daily Courier newspaper could turn out to be a test bed for easily searchable, computerized versions of a "newspaper of record" for every county in Illinois, all accessible via the Web.

Tech recycler finds way to Danville

DANVILLE – A St. Louis nonprofit business known for recycling and refurbishing computers is expanding in Danville, all because its president is directionally challenged.

Angela Haas, who started WITS (Web Innovations and Technology Services) in 2002, was supposed to view a couple of potential expansion sites in Newman but somehow missed a turn and ended up in Danville. Instead of turning around, she decided to check into whether Danville had any vacant buildings that met her needs – in other words, anything cheap.

New software helps iPod users organize songs, find music

CHAMPAIGN – David Tcheng has played in local bands for 20 years. Now he's putting his love of music and computers together to help iPod and MP3 player users organize their music collections.

Tcheng, a research programmer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, worked to develop software that can analyze music and categorize it.

Profs developing circuitry pick N.C. as home, C-U as research base

URBANA – Wouldn't it be great if you could put electronics wherever you want?

No longer would they be constrained to rigid, bulky surfaces like wafers and glass. Instead, they could be put on almost any surface – rubber, plastic, fabric, even large-scale areas.

Parkland offers high school students intro to technology

CHAMPAIGN – It's not often that students are asked to destroy their UFOs.

But the command came frequently in a game-design computer class, part of Parkland College's fourth annual Tour IT career information program for high school students.