All Technology Content

All Technology Content

Students shred in 20 steps

Sure, to shred a piece of paper you could just tear it into strips with your hands, and if you don't want to do that, any office supply store sells automatic paper shredders these days.

But where's the fun in that?

Software shows Mona Lisa to be neither man, nor da Vinci

Mona Lisa probably wasn't a man, and it's even more unlikely that the famous artist who painted the famous painting used himself as the model.

So conclude University of Illinois researchers, who created a buzz last year when their facial-recognition software was used to analyze the Mona Lisa's enigmatic smile. (Conclusion: The model was happy, with touches of disgust, fear and anger, at least as Leonardo da Vinci painted her.)

Quantum bits help yield some computer ESP

If you don't ask somebody a question and they give you the answer to the question you were thinking about asking but didn't, you might mark it down to an odd coincidence, or to ESP.

If your computer is on and you don't run a Google search and you still get an answer, you might think a hacker has taken over the machine, or a cyber-savvy poltergeist.

UI business building will have solar panels

CHAMPAIGN – Solar power will supply some of the energy for a new College of Business building.

The building will be the UI's first "green" or sustainable building, meaning it is designed to be more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly. Thanks to a $186,500 grant from the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation, the building will include solar panels on its auditorium roof.

Champaign site getting funding boost

CHAMPAIGN – The Illini Entrepreneurship Center in Champaign will receive about 16 percent more in state dollars this year than it did last year, state officials announced today.

The center, which serves startup businesses in East Central Illinois, will get $350,000 for the current fiscal year, up from $300,000 for the year that ended June 30, 2005.

A bridge to explaining troubled waters

Put a cutting board or something else flat in the bottom of your kitchen sink and turn on the faucet.

You should see a thin film of water in the rough circle that makes up the middle, a band of roiling, albeit miniature, rapids after that and finally a stretch where the puddle you've made flattens and flows with more or less even regularity.

Schools looking to use Internet for record keeping

TOLONO – Sue Hansen distinctly remembers looking at computers and not wanting anything to do with them.

The Unity Junior High social studies teacher went to college before the computer age, and said that before this year, whenever she had the opportunity to work on the machines, she passed.

Sensors tiny enough to fit in cell

DNA molecules wrapped around tiny carbon nanotubes get a charge out of particles from toxic substances such as mercury, or rather the exposure causes the DNA's own charge to change.

In response, the DNA subtly rearranges itself, allowing more water to reach the surface of the nanotube, which causes it to glow, in essence, with near infrared light.

UI tech official urges people to update protections

Blackworm may sound like something that worries farmers with crops in the field, but the people really concerned about it are folks like Mike Corn.

Corn may have the last name for it, but he doesn't farm. He's the director of security services and information privacy at the University of Illinois Campus Information Technologies and Educational Services division.