Health Care

Authoritative sources, ease of use vital in a Web site

Web sites covering all manner of health and medical information are more than readily available.

The problem is picking out good ones from the not so good, and the just plain bad.


Looking into family history can help prevent health problems

It's not exactly the easiest conversation starter: "So, Grandma, when did you get breast cancer? And Grandpa, can you tell me about your diabetes?"

But conversations like that can save your life.


There's no doubt: Time to scope it out

While the thought of having a colonoscopy might be daunting for many patients, there is another thought to keep in mind.

"Colon cancer is a preventable disease," said Dr. Gary Griglione, a gastroenterologist at Carle Clinic.


Due for a booster shot? It's best to research it first

Most adults know the value of getting a flu shot in the fall. But what about other vaccines for mature folks?

Dr. Jigar Thakkar of Carle Clinic, who is board-certified in family practice and working on a fellowship in geriatrics, said doctors generally use the Centers for Disease Control as their resource.


Families should prepare for an emergency

Disasters can strike anywhere and at any time, but people don't always prepare.

In a natural disaster, such as a flood or hurricane, people may be without essential services for up to seven days, said Stephen Laker, Vermilion County public health administrator.


How to get a speedy diagnosis in your own home

Modern technology is making it much easier to keep track of the state of your health, even from home.

Blood pressure monitors now can, within seconds, provide an accurate reading of a person's systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings, as well as resting heart rate.


Getting the facts about breast-feeding

In recent years, registered nurse Diane Bolin has noticed that breast-feeding is becoming more popular among new mothers.

"We encourage moms to breast-feed," said Bolin, who is one of four lactation consultants at Provena United Samaritans Medical Center's Family Life Center.


Cold medicines can do more harm than good for young kids

The next time your baby has a cough or stuffy nose, don't reach for the medicine chest.

A new advisory from the Food and Drug Administration warns parents not to use over-the-counter cough and cold products for infants and children younger than 2 – and to take precautions before giving them to older children.


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