Illinois Ancestors: New Irish Lives Remembered online

Illinois Ancestors: New Irish Lives Remembered online

The July/August edition of Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy e-Magazine is now available free on the Internet at http://www.irishlivesremembered.com. The cover story spotlights actor George Clooney, whose Irish ancestors left County Kilkenny and settled in Kentucky.

Recent research indicates that the Clooney homestead, now in the Burke family, is still standing, "a farm outbuilding with a tin roof." The current owners remember the Clooneys. The article includes several old photos of that family.

Similar to previous issues, which have focused on Irish research in a specific county, this issue devotes 16 pages of articles and research information to county Tyrone.

Author Joe Buggy's article, "Tracing the Irish in Kentucky," provides useful information for researching anyone in that U.S. state.

Maureen Wlodarczyk's article pertains to William Michael Higgins and his popular newspaper, "Kentucky Irish American," published from 1898 to 1968.

Shauna Hicks has an article on researching the Irish in Australia (post 1901) using military records.

Kay Caball tells of her new book,"The Kerry Girls' Emigration and the Earl Grey Scheme," which traces the fate of 117 Kerry girls who were sent from several workhouses to Australia in 1849/1850.

A 1910 photo from the Poole Photographic Collection in the National Library of Ireland depicts the staff of a local grocery store lined up in front of a store wearing their typical uniforms. Jayne Shrimpton's article provides information on such stores and their employees.

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) has furnished two unidentified photos taken by photographer, Herber Cooper (1874-1960.) One image is of a family of six children all lined up in a row; five are girls and the youngest is a boy. The other photo is of 2 young men; one is standing and one is seated. These are just a sampling of many PRONI photographs that need identification. To view them all (and perhaps add identification directly to the website) visit http://www.flickr.com/photos/proni. One can browse through the thousands of thumbnail images and then click on any to see a larger print. They include individuals, families, even a couple with six young children, couples, mothers with new babies, wedding parties, men in uniform, children, large groups, structures, and street scenes (some dated and labeled.) Anyone with ancestors from the counties of Tyrone, Donegal, and/or Down, where the photographer was known to have visited, might be surprised to see a familiar image at this website.

Also, the clothes worn by the subjects are especially interesting.

Seeing so many beautiful unidentified photographs emphasizes the importance of labeling any photographs in one's personal collection. Don't postpone the labeling project any longer!

From the publication's homepage one can click on a link to any of the past 23 issues, each focusing on a specific county in Ireland. One does not have to be Irish to enjoy this colorful, informative, free publication.

Sangamon County featured

The Sangamon County Historical Society has posted a website with details of that county's history at SangamonLink at http://sangamoncountyhistory.org/wp. There, one can click on a link to the lengthy Index, which provides access to a vast variety of subjects such as Coal Mining Fatalities and the Hall of Flags.

Be sure to click on the link to local history research sources which are both offline and online.

As stated on the website, "Whether you're curious about a specific topic or simply browsing, we hope you'll find this archive both useful and illuminating. Comments, suggestions and corrections are encouraged."

Lithuanians in Springfield

At http://lithspringfield.com one can find "100+ years of family, church and business history with photos of the original immigrants, obituary info, veterans listings for World Wars I and II and news and events from our community today."

For example, who put the "Mack" in McDonald's Springfield? The answer lies in Lithuanian-American history involving a family aptly named Mack. (Lithu: Makarauskas).

There is also a link to information on Senator Richard J. Durbin, "one of Lithuania's best friends in Washington."

Queries, genealogical questions from researchers and genealogical materials readers would like to share will be printed in this column free. Joan Griffis may be reached via email at jbgriffis@aol.com or by sending a letter to Illinois Ancestors, c/o The News-Gazette, P.O. Box 677, Champaign, IL 61824-0677.

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