Mahomet-Seymour strike continues

Mahomet-Seymour strike continues

MAHOMET – Mahomet teachers will be on strike again today.

Contract negotiations ended when the board's negotiating team walked out around 9 p.m. Thursday.

"We asked the MSEA to make a serious and significant move and its proposal, and they chose not to do that," said Terry Greene, president of the Mahomet-Seymour school board. "The board did make a movement on salary. It wasn't enough. The proposal we got back even had some extra things on it. Before we can settle this contract dispute, the MSEA leadership needs to get serious about what it needs to do in trying to spend down the school district's resources."

The school board proposed a two-year contract, coming up to 3.5 percent for secretaries, nurses, transportation workers and custodians; teacher aides would get step plus 1 percent, which means a 3.1 percent increase in the average teacher salary schedule.

In the second year, all support staff and teacher aides would get 4 percent increases in the average teacher salary schedule.

But they did not come up for certified teachers, which was a deal-breaker for teachers.

"Our teachers can't accept that," said Joan Jordan, co-president of the Mahomet-Seymour Education Association, said. "I don't know what they have against certified teacher. Terry Greene is trying to make a point that the administration and the board is trying to run this district. There's no excuse for that."

Eric Potter, spokesperson for the MSEA, also said in a written release that the Mahomet-Seymour school district is due about $700,000 to $750,000 from the Federal Education Jobs bill targeted to pay teachers and support professionals, according to a preliminary report from the Illinois State Board of Education.

"A fair contract is affordable with current revenues," he said in the release, "with no tax increase needed."

At least a couple of students are upset they won't be in school today.

Tabytha Lawless, 16, of Mahomet, a junior, said she sees the teachers' side of things but would like to go back to school.

"I think (the teachers) should probably get more money," she said. "But I don't think they should go on strike about it. I would rather be in school than running around picketing."

She said she is "kind of mad" about it, "because everybody else is starting school."

Lawless also does not want to see sporting events such as the first football game against Mount Zion canceled because of the strike.

Bri Wisehart, 15, of Mahomet, a sophomore, agreed.

"I think it's not really fair to all the students," she said.

Wisehart said she would like see the teachers and district peacefully work something out while the students continue to go to school.

"I (am) upset because we could still be going to school and the teachers could be working it out while we're at school. They could have meetings after school."

Teachers will walk the picket line from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. today at Middletown Early Childhood Center and Sangamon Elementary School.

A negotiation session has been scheduled for 1 p.m. today at Mahomet-Seymour High School.

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dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 7:08 am

There was a very real concern that the first contract the board offered would hurt the people who made less money. They would be taking home a lot less, and they were the ones that could least afford it. This contract offer addresses it, and the union turned it down. Very disheartening.

Au1 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

Well said.

archer6 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 7:08 am

The board needs to continue to stand fast! Don't move another inch! Most of these teachers are very good, hard working people, no one denies that. Unfortunately, they have allowed themselves to be taking over by some arrogant idiots such as Joan Jordan and Linda Meachum, neither of whom I would let potty train my dog. In the "teacher's world" they are the only ones that work hard, not realizing that many of us work 40+ hours weekly for a FULL 12 MONTHS! Enough is enough we are tired of paying more taxes. To show thier ignorance though, they now bring Eric Potter out to say something stupid about the federal money the school district is going to be getting. He must think that comes from the majical federal money tree. No you morons, that comes from our taxes too. Just because Obama wants to take us down the road to Socialism, doesn't mean we follow like a bunch of dumb sheep.

If you are not back to work Monday, I say start passing out the pink slips.

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 7:08 am

The Federal money is already approved, so regardless of whether Mahomet would use it, it is coming out of our taxes. When is this money suppose to actually arrive?

I do not want our teachers handed pink slips. Our teachers are good teachers and I want them back in the classroom. So this strike needs to end. I am disappointed that this offer was turned down as it addressed things that supposedly the union was most upset about.

People, get back to the table and work this out like adults please.

Interested wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

You don't have to worry about pink slips. There are labor laws in this country.

Dove7997 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

Dear Archer6,
For the record, it is spelled "their". Also, there is no "j" in "magical". I hope your teachers didn't get paid too much.

heavyweight wrote on August 20, 2010 at 7:08 am

Dear MSEA,
The Board and Administration DO run this district. They were ELECTED, not HIRED.
Right now they are doing a GREAT job.

sadbulldog wrote on August 20, 2010 at 7:08 am

Ms. Jordan indicates the school board president "trying to make a point that the administration and the board is trying to run this district. There's no excuse for that," Excuse me Ms. Jordan, the taxpayers of the school district elected the school board to run the school district. Perhaps, we could remember the mission of our school district - I believe it is the community and the school working together. I would suggest the negotiation team curb the comments in the press by Ms. Jordan. She seems to keep putting her foot in her mouth and stirring up bad feelings on both sides!

bulldogmom wrote on August 20, 2010 at 7:08 am

I have someone close to me who is a teacher, and know just how underpaid teachers really are for the job they do. When families do not hold themselves to a high standard, it is the teachers who have to pick up the pieces, work with and assist those children to give them and everyone else in the classroom a solid education. However, how much money is it going to take before the kids can go back to school? This teacher I know doesn't work in this district, doesn't get paid as much as Mahomet teachers, and is still happy doing the job set out for him. He loves his job, cares about his students, supports his family and doesn't let money get in the way of a higher education. Again, I do respect the job that you do, but with the economy in a shambles, the State of Illinois owing so much money to so many, where will this money come from? Oh, the Federal Education Job bill. Why would you take money from the Federal goverment, considering there is a defecit of $13 trillion dollars? If you think it is tough with what you have, why don't you google the great depression and at how people lived then. Some lost everything and lived out of their cars. If you think not getting a raise is the end of the world, think again. I didn't get one this year, paid more in insurance, and am still thankful for my job. Be happy that you live in such a great community, be happy with your friends and loved ones and be happy that you can support your family with the job that you have! As of July 2010 there are 10.3 % of those who live in Illinois out of a job right now.

PrudentOne wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Trying not to have an opinion, however, we all have one, so here goes! First of all to all of the dedicated and hard working teachers who give so much to the children of Mahomet, Dewey and Seymour, IL, a very BIG THANK YOU! You are appreciated throughout the entire year by the parents through the parent volunteers who also are dedicated to making M-S Schools one of the top rated school districts in the state. There are many, many parents that give items, culture and extra dollars to make your year enjoyable. The parents help through fund raisers, classroom time, and enrich the lives of many other children as well as through extra curricular programs for free to the district. Mahomet-Seymour would not be as rich in the educational experience if it were not for the parents that care to make it that way. People flock to Mahomet in order for their children to benefit from such a caring community and yes, we all pay higher taxes just to have the benefit of such wonderful schools.

Now is not the time to fight over pay increases as well as health benefits! There are over 15,000 teachers that have received lay off notices throughout the state of Illinois. There is a deficit of 5 billion dollars of unpaid bills by the state. There is a deficit of 120 billion dollars in the state pension fund. Unemployment is at an all time high across the nation. If the school district has a reserve, don’t blow it in one year! It is prudent for the school district to save for a rainy day or many rainy days. No programs have had to be cut, no layoff notices have been issued and we have a reserve! What happens next year if there are no reserves, a tax increase? Should the life long residents, who are on a fixed income, with no pay increases continue to be penalized? Should the single parents that are working two and three jobs suffer financially so that the teachers in the M-S School district get higher salaries? Should the children suffer through a financially strapped school district when the reserves are gone? 2011 will see many new taxes that will further financially strap people in ways they did not see coming! Are you ready for more of a tax burden?

Teachers that have two master degrees, continued education, you are phenomenal and we are grateful to have your expertise to share your knowledge with our precious children! Have you sent out your resume lately? Try it and see what kind of position you will be able to find that pay you what you are worth today. There are many college graduates, long time employee’s with just as much education that are not finding work and they are taking positions that are well below their expertise and below their pay grade! Get this settled and let’s get the school year on track!

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 10:08 am

That's a silly argument. If the state is not doing its job, then call the elected officials. Stop electing "common sense" politicians who actually have no sense.

Also, the idea that the federal government should try to balance its budget during a recession shows how uneducated people are about economics and history. If the banks won't loan money, and the government shouldn't spend, how will the economy rebound? Space cash?

It really gets tiresome listening to uneducated people spout off about things they know nothing about.

youhavetobekidding wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

How can anyone take seriously the argument that the Mahomet teachers have it so bad when private school teachers work just as hard and care just as much about their students? They make a PITTANCE compared to the public school teachers and in a number of cases have NO benefits.

When there are people out there doing the same work for much, much less, it is hard to feel sorry for the 'oppressed' teachers in Mahomet.

English1 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

How can anyone argue that the school board has it so bad when they are building a $12 Million dollar Administration center instead of spending the money where kids will benefit. People really need to look at the facts.

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

I have heard that there will be a new kindergarten building and since Middleton also houses the administration offices, I guess you can say that it is an administration building as well. You kind of left out the fact that it is for kindergarten as well. You also left out the fact that the building that exists now is inadequate, and probably would not pass OSHA standards. So the teachers are saying the board is giving half truths, this is an example of half truths as well.

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 10:08 am

It is definitely true the new building is needed.

It's also true that uneducated people are great at supporting things like construction and not very open to things like education and salaries for educators.

Dove7997 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 11:08 am

Completion of the new early childhood center is projected to be comleted in 2014, and that is IF it gets finished on time. That is a much needed facility. I was actually shocked to learn that Mahomet-Seymour didn't offer full-day kindergarten for their students. Then it was explained to me that with the size of the building and the number of students enrolled, they simply couldn't accommodate that many students for a full day, given the limited number of classrooms. I hope that being "pro-construction" doesn't make me "uneducated" as another person in this thread has stated. I consider myself "pro-student" and hope that everyone can get back into the classrooms as soon as possible.

youhavetobekidding wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

Um, it is the taxpayers' money. Not the school board's. Board members are elected by the community and responsible for spending that money as they see fit to run the school district. If you don't like how they're spending money, vote them out in the next election.

You did nothing to address the issue of Mahomet teachers making significantly more money than private school teachers and receiving far superior benefits yet they are still arguing that the Board's offer is unacceptable and that they are being disrespected. In this context, for them to complain that what they are receiving is not enough is ludicrous.

Uneducated4Real wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

Do these pay increases have to be percentages across the board? I mean, we have a progressive tax system where higher earners pay more and lesser fortunates pay less. Couldn't we arrange higher percentage increases to some of the younger, lower earners and not quite so much to the older, luckier, wealthier earners?

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Uneducated, that was what last nights offer was. They increased what they offered to the lower paid workers, and the union turned it down because all that was in it for the teachers was the step increases, which is 2.1% this year and 3% next year. The teachers ARE getting and increase, one in line with this economy, they want more.

Interested wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

English1,

The teachers are not the administration. You do not get to decide the budget and priorities. They are planning for a new administration building for good reason, including the condition of Middletown and the need for space for day-long kindergarten. Kids will benefit from this.

Also, $12 million is a frugal amount for a building that will presumably last 50 years. It amount to only about $600 per employee per year. (Coincidentally, the district has offered to increase the insurance contribution by $600 per employee per year.)

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Thank you. All day kindergarten has been needed for years, and when I saw 12 million was the figure, I thought, wow, that is not that expensive in today's building costs. They are being frugal.

Janet wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

Two things that really bother me about the comments the Union keeps making are (1) That the offer is not fair, and that (2) They care about the students. Why don't they just put the real truth out there: If they cared about the students they would not have done this when it would disrupt school, and it's all about them. There are few people outside of the Mahomet school district who would read this and not think what they have been offered is a great deal. I work in the real world--right down 74, where we haven't had raises in 2 years now. But now I know that Mahomet teachers are so much better at their jobs that I am at mine, and so much more caring, that they deserve better than me. What bites is that they'll get it because school will have to start. What a bunch of garbage.

English1 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

Teachers and Unions do not choose when to strike. Guidelines for a strike are set by law. If teachers do not strike on the first day of school, there would be no negotiations. There would be no meetings. Whatever ridiculous contract the school Board offered would be in effect the moment the teachers walked through the door.
Most Board negotiations involve signing off on those parts of the contract that there is agreement on (more than 90% of the contract is not in dispute). This Board (for the first time in Mahomet history) has refused to do that. That means it was all or nothing on the first day of school. They wanted this strike!
Negotiations for this contract started in February when the union made an offer. The Board did not budge on the offer until 29 days before school started. Why? because by law the union has to file an "intent to strike" 30 days before the first day of school. They wanted this strike to happen. They've been playing the public and the union for months now.

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

That is ridiculous. The board has children in school as well. They are doing a good job in holding the line on costs, something most government agency don't do. The contract 3 years ago were forced on them with a threat to strike when the school was in the red. The teachers forced 5% raises at a time when the economy was going south and people were already starting to get poor raises. The bargaining unit seems to think that Mahomet is immune to this recession and has said so in sound bites. It show they are not in tune to the people in the district at all. The board gave an offer last night to help the people most hurting and they turned it down.

Au1 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

I had Mrs. Jordan as a fifth grade teacher several years ago. She was, and presumably still is, a wonderful teacher. She's also a bully. It does not surprise me in the least that she is the most vocal of the union. All this to say that I cannot believe that the union won't take the high road and rise above this. The bottom line is that kids are not in school. Why isn't that more important than insurance costs or raises?

TrojanMan78 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

The union stranglehold on the community is WAY more important then the kids. The kids might be a FAR distant second.

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 1:08 pm

We'll see how true that is when the time for the first FB game approaches, and the real crazies in the community come out of the woodwork.

English1 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Mrs. Jordan is the offical spokesperson for the negotiations team. She is also retiring, so her salary increase is set regardless of the outcome of these negotiations. She gets no benefit from this upcoming contract other than knowing that the Board isn't trying to take advantage of public opinion to hurt the workers in the district.

mikeatcms wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

To all of those out there who are complaining about the teachers asking for a raise and that they make enough money in this horrible economy. Please see below. This is what your district is paying your administrators (aka management). My source is familytaxpayer.org

Name: Oates, Keith
Salary: $174,309
Position: District Superintendent
Full/Part Time: Fulltime
Percent Time Employed: 100%
Assignment: Administration
Years Teaching: 17
Degree: Doctorate
School Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3
District Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3

Name: Northrup, Christine
Salary: $114,154
Position: Elementary Principal
Full/Part Time: Fulltime
Percent Time Employed: 100%
Assignment: Administration
Years Teaching: 16
Degree: Master's
School Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3
District Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3

Name: Cresap, Laura
Salary: $114,154
Position: Assistant District Superintendent
Full/Part Time: Fulltime
Percent Time Employed: 100%
Assignment: Administration
Years Teaching: 16
Degree: Master's
School Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3
District Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3

Name: Cabutti, Mark
Salary: $112,802
Position: Elementary Principal
Full/Part Time: Fulltime
Percent Time Employed: 100%
Assignment: Administration
Years Teaching: 28
Degree: Master's
School Name: Sangamon Elem School
District Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3

Name: Starwalt, Jeffrey
Salary: $102,245
Position: Assistant Jr High/Middle Principal
Full/Part Time: Fulltime
Percent Time Employed: 100%
Assignment: Administration
Years Teaching: 19
Degree: Master's
School Name: Mahomet-Seymour Jr High School
District Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3

Name: Williams, Elvie
Salary: $129,512
Position: Assistant High School Principal
Full/Part Time: Fulltime
Percent Time Employed: 100%
Assignment: Administration
Years Teaching: 30
Degree: Master's
School Name: Mahomet-Seymour High School
District Name: Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3

I think there might be some room for concessions.

Uneducated4Real wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

Informative and interesting, but irrelevant. That the administrators may or may not be overpaid does not affect the separate legitimacy of the MSEA demands.

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 11:08 am

Administrator pay is irrelevant, but the uneducated rants about "doing more with less" or the economy are relevant?

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 12:08 pm

The teachers are going to be given a raise over the cost of the insurance increase. How is that doing more for less?

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 1:08 pm

You must be uneducated about percentages and how they work with smaller numbers. The insurance increase is a flat cost; salaries and increases vary because of percentages.

Educate yourself and then come back.

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

I believe the administrators took a pay freeze. And they are not striking. The boss always gets paid more. SHould I go to my boss, or my bosses boss and demand they make the same as me. I get tired of this quarrel, if they want this type of money, go into administration and get the headaches that come with it. Why did you leave Middleton's principle off the list? Is it because she makes under 100K?

PrudentOne wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Where all of these administrators teachers at one time? Should the administration be paid more than the teachers due to their education, expertise and ability to run a wonderful school district? Should they be paid less than they are worth? What does their salary have to do with the teachers salary? How do their salary's compare with the state average that are in the top 3% of the state? Is this a hair splitting session? What is the number one objective here, the children of the district or the teachers? Who are the losers when school does not start? How are the teachers being paid during the strike? What about the seniors in high school and the athletes, and band members, and the children entering kindergarten and all of the new students that were so scared to go their first day, and the parents that were sending their children for the first time, and on and on and on? What about the parents that are working that have to find additional day care and the extra expense to them? Who wins here?

Interested wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Just so we are comparing apples with apples, these 12-month salaries should be reduced to an 8-month equivalent in order to compare them with teacher salaries. On this pro-rata basis they would be:
Oats: $116,264
Northrup, Cresap: $76,141
Cabutti: $75,240
Starwalt: $68,197
Williams: $86,385

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 10:08 am

Shallenberger is also an admistrator if you look in the list her salary is in the 90's, so would be reduced down as well.

TrojanMan78 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

"A negotiation session has been scheduled for 1 p.m. today at Mahomet-Seymour High School."

Simple, the board says go back to work with your 2.1% increase or we will fire every one of you.

I'm sure there are plenty of other laid of teachers that would love to get paid what these teachers do.

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 11:08 am

Labor law prevents moves like that.

This has been pointed out to you again and again, but you still don't grasp it. No wonder you are poorly educated.

Mahomet Mom wrote on August 20, 2010 at 8:08 am

I just received an email from two school board members. There is an OPEN meeting MONDAY 7pm at the high school library. The Board is urging people to attend. Please go if possible and express your views. They need our support and the teachers need to see what this is doing to the community. If you are unable to attend, please email the board and let them know how you feel.
mgiles@ms.k12.il.us

bryherd@ms.k12.il.us

vniswander@ms.k12.il.us

cmelchi@ms.k12.il.us

vwoodruff@ms.k12.il.us

mmccomb@ms.k12.il.us

tgreene@ms.k12.il.us

English1 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

The teachers know what this is doing to the community. The VAST majority of the teachers are part of the community and have children who attend Mahomet schools.
The board forced this strike upon the community. Please ask them:
1) Why did you not sign off on any part of the contract except the disputed areas so the teachers could feel safe going to school with a partial contract?
2) Why did you choose to increase class sizes by firing teachers last year while purchasing new land for a new school and hiring architects to plan on ripping down Middletown to build a cozy administration and business building?
3) Why does 1% pay means so much to you -- so much that you are willing to keep kids out of school when you have over $1 Million in cash revenue on hand?
4) Why did Tens of Thousands of federal dollars that must be spent on staff did not change your mind about a 1% pay increase?
5) Why were some budget documents removed from the official school website?
6) Why will you not accept a 1 year contract at step + 1%?
7) Why are you willing to keep my kids out of school to save such a little bit of money?

Interested wrote on August 20, 2010 at 10:08 am

1) Why did you not sign off on any part of the contract except the disputed areas so the teachers could feel safe going to school with a partial contract?
I assume that is because they want to be able to plan for the entire year. I can't speak about what the teachers feel but there is no reason to think that the board would withdraw any agreements already reached, since that would be illegal "bad-faith" bargaining.
2) Why did you choose to increase class sizes by firing teachers last year while purchasing new land for a new school and hiring architects to plan on ripping down Middletown to build a cozy administration and business building?
Perhaps because Middletown is falling down and because more kindergarten space will be needed for full-day kindergarten in the future.
3) Why does 1% pay means so much to you -- so much that you are willing to keep kids out of school when you have over $1 Million in cash revenue on hand?
You understand that this reserve is a lump sum, but the salary increase will be a continuing expense, right? So how do we pay for these salary increases in the future years, once this reserve has been spent?
4) Why did Tens of Thousands of federal dollars that must be spent on staff did not change your mind about a 1% pay increase?
Once again, this is money that is only available for one year. Why doesn't the union propose a one-time payment to staff members instead of demanding a permanent pay increase?
5) Why were some budget documents removed from the official school website?
Sounds like a consipracy theory to me. Why would the district budget be relevant to a salary negotiation anyway? Do you assume that salaries should be the highest they can possibly be?
6) Why will you not accept a 1 year contract at step + 1%?
Asked and answered.
7) Why are you willing to keep my kids out of school to save such a little bit of money?
That axe cuts both ways.

Now it's my turn to ask a question. All employees are being given a pay increase via their step increase. Why should the whole pay schedule be increased in a time when there is no consumer inflation?

rareagle wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

There are a lot of people out of work and the ones that do have a job are happy just to have one. I think the teachers need to be happy that they are working. This is hurting the kids more than anyone, but the teachers don't seem to care. It's all about them. If Ronald Reagan can fire air traffic controls for going on strike, why can't the school find teachers who are happy just to a job?

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

That will not get school started, it would delay it. The M-S schools have good teachers, they need to go to work. They are getting an increase, so they should take it and stop striking.

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 12:08 pm

Labor laws prevent that. This has been pointed out again and again, but the uneducated aren't getting it.

Also, Reagan's act is irrelevant here. Only the uneducated find some unrelated item they manage to recall and then try to apply it everywhere.

mahcit wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Just to be totally fair...

Using the same source you did: http://www.familytaxpayers.org/salary.php

Teacher Salary Database

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3 2009 - Download data
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NAME SALARY
Oates, Keith $174,309
Williams, Elvie $129,512
Northrup, Christine $114,154
Cresap, Laura $114,154
Cabutti, Mark $112,802
Starwalt, Jeffrey $102,245
Weaver, Mary $95,970
Shallenberger, Carol $93,465
Rose, Ric $93,206
Hensley, Matthew $90,596
Appenzeller, Thomas $89,163
Cheek, Shannon $88,170
Jordan, Joan $86,202
Gumbel, Melissa $86,091
Patrick, Barbara $85,632
Warren, Patricia $83,779
Atchley, Verlann $81,484
Sallade, Randy $81,484
Simpson, Patricia $78,954
Klein, Petrece $78,462
Ryan, Rita $78,242
Rayburn, Jackie $77,490
Litchfield, Marilyn $77,091
Aubry, Pamela $76,073
Meachum, Linda $75,815
Carlier, Frances $75,264
Pogue, David $75,255
Porter, Patricia $74,664
Mougey, Nancy $74,554
Risley, James $72,104
Stipp, Duane $71,676
Murdoch, Thomas $71,233
Dunn, Lynne $71,165
Vallowe, Janet $71,165
Ledin, Rob $71,121
Bennett, Kathleen $70,746
Ruggles, Sally $70,480
Casey, Shirley $70,480
Porter, Courtney $70,004
Murphy, Candi $69,153
Campion, Jeanne $69,062
Rowell, Kathleen $68,834
Jackson, Rita $67,903
Brown, Carolyn $67,814
Garrison, Neal $67,290
Marker, M.Patricia $66,945
Seal, Nathan $66,463
Manfredo, Leslie $66,131
Calcagno, Kari $66,026
Heinold, James $65,923
Potter, Eric $65,882
Cosner, Nancy $65,723
Stevens, Michael $65,570
Wills, Joellyn $64,564
Duling, Susan $64,511
Lichtblau, Eileen $64,511
Kyle, Jill $64,289
Musgrove, Elizabeth $64,172
Kennedy, Kristine $63,789
Negangard, Pamela $63,658
Hawk, Bethany $63,444
Schwarzentraub, Brian $62,445
Rinkel, Lisa $62,199
Rippy, Lu $62,199
Weimer, John $62,120
Gaydos, Patricia $62,068
Pirtle, Dan $62,006
Myers, Julia $61,841
Young, Debra $61,787
Lavin, Kimberly $61,658
Martin, Cynthia $61,514
Rushing, Patti $61,424
Starbird, Kathryn $60,591
McClughen, Dianna $60,075
Coulson, Kay $59,511
Henson, Lori $59,216
Armstrong, Mary $58,530
Welch, Lu $58,270
Veldman, Kari $58,111
Bosworth, Kristine $57,855
Koker, Terry $57,855
Johnson, Kimberly $57,835
Gough, Shauna $57,540
Koelkebeck, Janice $57,328
Risley, Juli $57,328
Kreps, Steven $56,607
DiFilippo, Nicholas $56,158
Forbes, Patti $56,005
Light, Germaine $55,980
Largent, Janet $55,859
Brandon, Tina $55,859
Padjen, Laurie $55,719
Adreon, Heidi $55,628
Russell, Christina $54,965
Mc Elmurry, Roberta $54,724
Lybarger, Timothy $54,397
Jessup, Nichole $54,078
Stack, Patricia $53,713
Halm, Pamela $53,713
Barth, Benjamin $53,632
Maxwell-Killion, Jennifer $53,232
Schickedanz, Jennifer $53,231
Fones, Sue $53,199
Diehl, Susan $52,781
Cebulski, Scott $52,415
Benedict, Chad $52,407
Stipp, Joan $51,877
Dueppen, Kathryn $51,668
Buzicky, Stacey $51,246
Easter, Candace $51,120
Veazie, Julie $50,882
Laley, Susan $50,864
Sanders, Karen $50,851
Martin, Lisa $50,812
Bryant, Jenna $50,418
Keeble, Susan $50,216
Herriott, Benjamin $49,987
Wherley, Jennifer $49,937
Cockerill, Kandy $49,527
Gonzalez-Johnson, Cynthia $49,443
Trujillo, Susan $48,852
Pagel, Angela $48,532
Hill, Meredith $48,140
Dykstra, Joan $47,985
Colbert, Jamie $47,971
Higgins, Amy $47,831
Lukach, Licia $47,717
Graham, Bridgett $47,525
Roberts, Amy $47,525
Andracke, Eric $47,171
Mills, Nathan $47,070
Ryan, Daniel $46,901
Wade, Tracy $46,822
Henrikson, Rebekah $46,684
Jamieson, Brenda $46,277
Gibson, Melissa $46,236
Riecks Soucek, Lisa $46,089
Hersom, Brett $46,058
East, Carrie $45,980
Snodgrass, Christine $45,972
Kleist, Allison $45,804
Bartholomew, Kimberly $45,804
Turek, Henry $45,787
Manuel, Marissa $45,758
Mills, Matthew $45,364
Holden, Amanda $45,348
Krumwiede, Cynthia $45,164
Gruner, Angelina $45,164
Briggs, Jessica $45,164
Ehrecke, Rhonda $45,110
Wingate, Melissa $45,013
Iverson, Pamela $44,951
Prather, Sandra $44,615
Dyer, Sarah $44,320
Benedict, Becky $44,320
Bartelt, Kristin $44,258
Allison, Kara $44,025
Ericson, Ellen $44,025
Clark, Lori $43,665
Miller, Nicole $43,411
Link, Angela $43,190
Fritz, Gay $42,858
O'Neal, Andrea $42,815
Uppinghouse, Justin $42,724
Timmons, Megan $42,672
Sivaguru, Geethapriya $42,472
Gillham, Elisabeth $42,173
Truax, Jeramie $42,115
Paragi, Philisha $41,962
Seal, Adrienne $41,614
Seo, Andrew $41,614
Kutylo, Matthew $41,361
Morphew, Gina $41,312
Cox, Kortny $40,961
Jones, Anthony $40,961
Graham, Erin $40,845
Penick, Amy $40,772
Burdette, Emily $40,351
Guth, Diane $40,241
McCumber, Marissa $40,177
Halfar, Derek $39,771
VanAntwerp, Julie $39,665
Cler, Susan $39,463
Sieben, Tara $38,929
Dworak, Nicole $38,923
Starkey, Rhonda $38,843
Kaper, Sarah $38,647
Day, Susan $38,647
Ohms, Ann $38,208
Vanderlip, Kristin $37,656
Pike, Erica $37,601
Ahrens, Anne $37,572
Blaser, Andrea $36,838
Henegar, Dana $36,525
Roesch, Keri $36,525
Thurman, Melinda $35,987
Willamon, Montana $35,421
Roberts, Rachel $35,421
Goldsberry, Kelley $31,035
Zimmerman, Lora $29,687
Badger, Karen $27,482
McMillan, Barbara $12,735
Bechtel, Jennifer $9,448
Moxley, Bonnie $7,232

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

I know the two on the bottom are part-time, Bechtel taught one class and was drama sponsor at the Junior High and is worth every penny she gets. Moxley is a coach, and she used to do study halls, not sure she still does. She is also very good at what she does.

Pointing this out so people don't think we pay full time teachers that low.+

English1 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Keep in mind that in addition to social security like everyone else, teachers pay a healthy percentage of their pay to TRS. This is money we won't see until we are 65, so unlike most published salaries -- we don't actually get paid this much. To be a fair comparison, the salary should be published minus the TRS contribution. Also, what benefits we receive from TRS at 65 is dependent on our average salary over 30+ years (which is currently being threatened by the board in the form of lower pay).

Uneducated4Real wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

I don't think you are being very persuasive. Whether you mean to or not, you are reinforcing the perception that this is all "me, me, me". In terms of work conditions, job security, overall compensation, retirement benefits, and health insurance, the MSEA is way ahead of all but a thin fraction of the community. Can you tell me how this strike is good for anyone OTHER than the MSEA? How does this help the kids? The community? Educator/community/administrator relations? What is the "up" point that some of us cannot yet see here? In my case, I am neutral but skeptical and waiting to be persuaded. So far, I am sorry to say that you have not made the case justifying this enormously disruptive (and potentially explosive) work stoppage.

dd1961 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

And my husband and I give 6% to our 401K's which we will not see until 67.5. And since it is a percentage it is also based on our pay and what we make over time. Your problem is that you think teachers have it so much worse than anyone else, and you don't. You are doing a job you love and doing it well. You are getting guaranteed yearly increases in the form of step, something the rest of the world does not get. You get more than adequate time off, which includes quite a bit of paid sick leave. And looking at that list, you are getting paid fairly well. Yes, you have bad things with your job, it can be difficult dealing with people, i.e. kids, but you are in the people business. If you don't like that, maybe you should have gone into IT and sat in a cubicle all day. Around here, you probably would get paid about the same.

Interested wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

English1,

That's true for everyone who contributes to their retirement benefits.

Another factor that should be considered is the teachers' pay is based on 8 months of work. (The administrators' salary is based on a 12-month schedule. We should reduce their pay by 1/3 for a direct comparison to teacher pay.)

Generally speaking, salaries are determined by market conditions. Is the current salary table high enough to attract the better teachers that we all want in M-S? If so, why should that whole table be increased in a time when inflation is essentially zero?

Mahomet Mom wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Wow! This is great pay for being off 3 months out of the year, off every holiday, a week of spring break, and two weeks at Chistmas. I went into the wrong career!

TheHarrowClub wrote on August 20, 2010 at 11:08 am

You know, if you have such a problem with the school calendar, why not get some people together and propose changes? I doubt you will find much support for getting rid of things like two weeks at "Chistmas," as you say.

You might be able to cut down on those 3 months (actually 2 1/2, but who other than the uneducated ranters is counting) of summer vacation. Some schools have more balanced calendars.

I think you'll find a lack of support in the community for those moves.

VIIFe wrote on August 20, 2010 at 12:08 pm

This is fair and public information; however, this information does NOT include the over 80 support staff members: aides, secretaries, custodians, bus drivers, and nurse.

sahuoy wrote on August 23, 2010 at 11:08 pm

The posting of teacher salaries is fair as shown. Reducing the salaries by contributions made to retirement is another attempt to hide the truth by showing a number less than actually paid. Everyone contributes to their retirement and adjusting the numbers to hide such data gives the impression you are making less when the reality is you will be paid those monies back in the future, same as everyone else, same as social security, etc. Nice try. Not buying your games MESA. Save your money for this time next year' strike!!!

PrudentOne wrote on August 20, 2010 at 9:08 am

Okay, let's talk retirement! How much would a 30+ year teacher expect to get when they retire when they are making approx. $90,000 a year for a 8 - 9 month position, keeping in mind no school days, school closings and such?

sadbulldog wrote on August 20, 2010 at 10:08 am

At this point, I say give the union their one year contract. They think the economy will be better next year, so they can negotiate better increases. All of us in the private sector feel we haven't reached the bottom yet and the economy will get worse. The union will then be negotiating in a situation where the economy is worse and may get nothing. Go ahead....fight for one year contract and get less or nothing in the second year when it is worse out there in the world!

mikeatcms wrote on August 20, 2010 at 12:08 pm

I understand everyones frustration with this situation. I guarantee teachers are not happy about the strike either but below is reality about education in the United States(source: putourkidsfirst.com) This is currently where the United States ranks throughout the world in Education. Is this really an area that we want to be tight with out pennies?
Area Rank (out of 41 Industrialized Nations)
Math 28
Reading 18
Science 22
Problem Solving 29

Mahomet is ranked in the top 3% of school districts in the state of Illinois. do we really want to fire the teachers that made this statistic a reality and hire unemployed teachers? Folks, Education has suffered in this country for a long time. We here in Mahomet have a system that works. Lets do what we have to do to get school going again.

cretis16 wrote on August 20, 2010 at 12:08 pm

WOW...thanks for the post on the salaries.....And these people want to go on strike???? Go figure? These are pretty impressive figures