Illinois House committee OKs bill restricting energy-drink sales

Illinois House committee OKs bill restricting energy-drink sales

SPRINGFIELD — A veteran state lawmaker said he's going to try again to ban the sale of energy drinks, such as Red Bull, to people under the age of 18.

But Rep. Luis Arroyo, D-Chicago, told a House committee Wednesday that his legislation needs modifications.

"I'm going to hold this and try to negotiate with the industry to try to come to an agreement," Arroyo said.

The House Executive Committee approved Arroyo's HB 2861 with the understanding that it wouldn't advance to passage stage on the House floor without an agreement between the lawmaker and beverage-industry representatives.

"My issue is, 'Don't sell energy drinks or any kind of stimulants to anybody under 18,'" Arroyo said. "It has ingredients in it that people don't know what it is. It's a synthetic and it creates a lot of problems with headaches and jitters and heart palpitations."

Arroyo has tried to pass similar bans in past legislative sessions without success. This time, he said, he's willing to work with opponents to pass the bill.

"It could be the age (of purchasers). It could be to put a label on the can. It could be to have it at a certain place in the store. There's room for negotiations," Arroyo said.

Republicans on the committee were skeptical.

"You have offered testimony that there are unknown ingredients in these drinks. But at least to my knowledge, the ingredients are on the bottle, on the packaging," said Rep. Chad Hays, R-Catlin. "You're testifying as if this is moonshine."

"I can drink moonshine. This is different," Arroyo said. "This is different because it's synthetic. It's got a pharmaceutical name. Nobody really knows what's in there, what taurine is.

"What it is, I don't know. Doctors don't even know what it is," he said. "But there's no comparison with coffee or soda. No comparison whatsoever."

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98782015 wrote on March 09, 2017 at 4:03 am

They sell Cocaine in the C/U area? Or is this just a random picture from the internet.

Bystander wrote on March 09, 2017 at 4:03 am
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The Big Nanny government is at it again. Hopefully, Arroyo's negotiations with the beverage industry will kill this liberal feel-good regulation.

billbtri5 wrote on March 09, 2017 at 7:03 am

...negotiations.....more like a shake down of the beverage industry....and nobody knows whats in there....

just Google Taurine,  the Mayo Clinic knows what it is.....hey  why not spend your time balancing the

budget....

AmeriBev wrote on March 10, 2017 at 10:03 am

To be clear, the FDA, European Food Safety Authority, and others have affirmed the safety of energy drinks and their ingredients. Moreover, most mainstream energy drinks actually have far less caffeine than a similar size coffeehouse coffee. In fact, many have about half as much.

 

Regarding the other ingredients contained in these products, it's also important to note that many are naturally occurring ingredients. For example, guarana derives from a nut-like seed native to South America and is a natural source of caffeine. Along similar lines, taurine is an amino acid found naturally in the human body, as well as in common food items such as seafood, scallops and poultry.

 

Even so, America's leading energy drink manufacturers voluntarily go far beyond all federal requirements when it comes to responsible labeling and marketing practices. This includes displaying total caffeine content - from all sources - on their packages, along with advisory statements indicating that the product is not recommended for children, pregnant or nursing women and persons sensitive to caffeine.

AmeriBev wrote on March 10, 2017 at 10:03 am

To be clear, the FDA, European Food Safety Authority, and others have affirmed the safety of energy drinks and their ingredients. Moreover, most mainstream energy drinks actually have far less caffeine than a similar size coffeehouse coffee. In fact, many have about half as much.

 

Regarding the other ingredients contained in these products, it's also important to note that many are naturally occurring ingredients. For example, guarana derives from a nut-like seed native to South America and is a natural source of caffeine. Along similar lines, taurine is an amino acid found naturally in the human body, as well as in common food items such as seafood, scallops and poultry.

 

Even so, America's leading energy drink manufacturers voluntarily go far beyond all federal requirements when it comes to responsible labeling and marketing practices. This includes displaying total caffeine content - from all sources - on their packages, along with advisory statements indicating that the product is not recommended for children, pregnant or nursing women and persons sensitive to caffeine.