Teachers: Arming us would spell nothing but trouble

Teachers: Arming us would spell nothing but trouble

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A career educator whose last job was in a town still recovering from a September school shooting, Bill Behrends had his own thoughts about the "knee-jerk" idea of putting guns in teachers' hands.

But just to be sure his views lined up with those of the ones who matter most, the Centennial High School social studies teacher turned President Donald Trump's proposal into a classroom discussion topic.

"When I asked my students this same question, the resounding response was that arming teachers would make the school feel more like a prison and less like an environment of understanding, care and support," Behrends says.

Last month's massacre at a south Florida high school has sparked talk of widespread changes to gun laws and school safety in a way that the non-fatal shooting at Mattoon, where Behrends taught for nine years, and the 17 others since at schools across the country failed to do.

The most widely debated solution suggested: Trump's call to arm teachers, which prompted emotional reactions from educators near and far.

"Good idea," says Lori Anderson, a junior high science teacher in Arcola. "Students are being killed with no other option. At least it gives us an option for defense that doesn't involve cowering behind locked doors waiting to be killed or shot."

"Bad idea," says Tricia Shaw, a music instructor in Monticello. "Is the NRA going to suggest we arm students next?"

To get a sense of where local educators stand on the issue, The News-Gazette surveyed 70 of them, representing 46 different schools — public and private, rural and urban, elementary through high school, based in seven area counties. (Nearly three dozen other teachers and principals declined to go on record with their stance, most of them citing the sensitivity of the topic as the reason).

Opinions are those of the educators and not the schools that employ them.

What we found:

— 57 of the 70 were adamantly opposed to any plan that involves teachers having guns.

— Five said they strongly support the idea.

— Three backed a version that doesn't include every teacher being armed.

— Two said they wouldn't object if it came to that, two others would prefer that taxpayers or state legislators make the decision, and one was in the undecided camp.

All agreed on one point, expressed by Oakwood Grade School teacher Lacey Boen: "I am saddened by what our society now has to face."

Here, in area teachers' own words, are why more than 80 percent of them believe there must be a better alternative.

 

As horrifying as the reports from Parkland, Fla., were — 17 dead, 14 more taken to hospitals — there's another unthinkable scenario that's inevitable in a school full of armed teachers.

"Let me reframe your question slightly," says Uni High chemistry teacher David Bergandine. "Instead, let's ask how long it will be before there is a headline in your paper that a teacher has wrongly shot a student who was pulling an object out of a backpack that looked like a gun."

"If a teacher makes a grave error in judgment," says Mahomet-Seymour football coach Keith Pogue, "I want it to be that my child received a B-plus instead of an A-minus, not shooting during a perceived threat and being wrong."

Mistakes happen — even to the best-trained, most highly-decorated members of law enforcement.

Take it from Iraq War combat veteran, former military police officer and LeRoy High School social science teacher Brad Marcy.

"Views on gun proliferation aside, there are simply too many liabilities that arise from having armed teachers," he says. "Case in point: the odds of you or a family member being shot actually increase when you bring a gun into your home. This will apply to schools as well. Whether it be collateral damage from a teacher employing lethal force to stop an immediate threat, accidental discharge from negligent handling of the weapon or students snooping and finding the teacher's weapon, these are issues that will arise."

And what if, in a frantic situation, a gun-carrying teacher is mistaken by law enforcement as the shooter, says Uni High Japanese instructor Mari Porter.

These were the most common fears expressed by respondents.

The chief counterpoint: Not every teacher would need to be armed.

Tom Davis, both the high school principal and superintendent at Heritage, says district officials there have had "many" discussions about school safety in recent months. While he "completely" understands the arguments against arming teachers, his most practical plan calls for government-supported training for "a couple personnel" at each school and a grant-funded locker of some sort that would hold "at least some type of device that could be used in a dire emergency."

"Either way," Davis says, "I would lay down my life to save anyone from this school district — student, parent, staff member — and if there was a tool to use in that worst-case scenario, I would be in favor of that tool being available."

 

Whether you believe the country has a gun problem or a mental health problem, the solution ought not to be to add even more guns to the equation.

"I personally would feel less safe knowing there was a gun in my classroom," says Salt Fork High School English teacher Lauren Hous, one of several respondents who expressed that sentiment.

Greg Ballweg speaks from experience on this topic: The third-grade dual-language teacher at Urbana's Leal Elementary grew up in Sandy Springs, Ga., an Atlanta suburb. His own middle school experience was quite unlike the one local kids are used to.

"I went through metal detectors and had lunch in a cafeteria with armed officers every day," he says. "Looking back on it, I never felt safer; rather, I felt more anxious and afraid. We can't fight fire with more firearms."

Jeremy Davis can relate, too. The Mahomet-Seymour science teacher grew up in a hunting family. He has fired an assault rifle and feels comfortable around guns.

But in the classroom? Never.

Beyond the catastrophic consequences of one teacher responding to a tense situation by pointing at a student a gun he or she just learned how to use, Davis fears that teacher-student relations would suffer irreparable damage.

"Teachers with weapons would create an adversarial overtone that would be harmful in producing meaningful, impactful relationships," he says. "Many kids that I taught in Rantoul saw the police as adversaries. If I had carried a gun while in school, I would not have been able to make bonds with some of those kids. In the end, it would have hurt my ability to teach."

Something else worth considering, says Heritage Elementary fifth-grade teacher David Harding: Think about the size and state of mind of some junior high and high school students.

"They could overpower (a teacher) and have access to a weapon that they might not have otherwise had," he says. "I think it would also desensitize the kids to guns and make it seem normal to carry weapons at work. ... Students need to learn that problems can be solved without guns — not that they are the solution to every problem."

 

Teachers have tough enough jobs as it is.

The first thing Yankee Ridge Elementary's Alexis Johnson thought when she heard the idea? "Whoever thought of this must have never worked in a classroom full of children."

"To throw this responsibility on top of the mountain of everything we do is honestly insulting," adds Sarah Travis, an Urbana elementary teacher.

Opponents of Trump's idea predict that Illinois' well-chronicled current teacher shortage would become a full-fledged epidemic if carrying a weapon ever becomes part of the job.

Urbana music teachers April Blacker and Roberta Westerman say that would be enough to make them quit the profession altogether — and they wouldn't be alone.

Says Blacker: "As a teacher myself, and speaking for many of my friends and colleagues, the day you try to arm us is the day many of us find new professions."

"During a state teacher shortage, would we even have enough teachers willing to participate in this extra duty?" wonders Edison Middle School's Jessica Nunez.

For every arming-teachers-seems-to-work-in-some-Texas-schools argument, there is no shortage of counter-arguments.

"We work hard to keep many things out of our schools that are dangerous to students, like cigarettes, asbestos and bleach, so it would be counter-intuitive to allow people to bring in the one thing that is blatantly dangerous to our students — guns," says Tim Lee, the principal at Oakwood High School. "If we don't allow guns on planes or in courthouses, then we should not allow guns in schools."

 

If there is a sudden stream of new funding to spend on education, there are wiser ways to use it.

"I would rather have a bulletproof set of doors and windows for each classroom than a weaponized faculty," said Don Anton, who teaches high school English at Blue Ridge.

Among the other ways educators would prefer any new money be spent:

— Beef up mental health services. "When I first became a school administrator in 2010, there was funding for county mental health professionals to come into the school and provide screenings, counseling and other services to students. This has since disappeared," says St. Joseph-Ogden Principal Gary Page.

— Make school buildings more secure. "You can put all of the 'No Guns Allowed' symbols and signs you want on the doors — this doesn't stop the shooters from bringing a gun into the building," says Barbie Burns, a faculty member at Farmer City's Schneider Elementary and a proponent of allowing teachers to conceal-carry.

— Invest in more school psychologists, social workers, textbooks and hallway paintings "to make coming to school more inviting," says Danville High math teacher Kelly Yohnka. "I am not a superhero. ... These things would 'save' our children, not me with a gun."

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yates wrote on March 04, 2018 at 9:03 am

I thought this debate was about arming capable teachers that wanted to be armed....not the ones afraid or unwilling to carry firearms.

fuddrules wrote on March 05, 2018 at 5:03 am

It is but as you see, lots of teachers need to use rif.org, starting with the Monticello teacher.  

bkp wrote on March 04, 2018 at 11:03 am

The schools here are already like prisons, except the inmates are running the asylum. Underperforming students don't get real assistance, they just get shuffled onto the next grade level until they hit high school and can finally drop out on their own.

jparks wrote on March 04, 2018 at 7:03 pm

It is still amazing to me how uninformed and naive some people choose to remain.

The proposal isn't to arm every teacher, whether they want it or not, with a gun.  Don't flatter yourself.  If you don't want to carry a gun in your school, you are the last person I would want to have one.  

My idea would be this.  Depending on the number of students in the school, an offer would be made to x number of teachers / administrators.  If you are willing to complete the required classroom and firing range qualifications and agree to carry a weapon in the school and assume all the legal and liability issues that can come with this responsibility to help defend you and the school population, you will be paid an additional $20,000 per year.

Oh, that somehow makes you want to think about it.  Some of you.

Nobody is asking unwilling participants to carry a gun in your school.

Get over yourself.  Thanks but no.  

This isn't about you.

More hallway paintings and school psychologists will help.

WOW.

 

Urbana71 wrote on March 04, 2018 at 9:03 pm

I'm having a little trouble buying into this survey because I just offered a free concealed carry class to any teacher that wants to attend (in anticipation of the law changing).  Normal class sizes are 10 to 12.  I had to cut this one off after quickly hitting 50 students.

 

This class will take place in Farmer City in June.  I have to wonder what schools you surveyed? Where they just hand-picked schools in selected areas? The feedback I have gotten from teachers is the exact opposite of this survey. 

 

I challenge the NG to provide balance in this article by reporting on this class in June.  At least 50 teachers will be taking it.  

 

Dean Hazen

 

Jeff D'Alessio wrote on March 04, 2018 at 10:03 pm
Profile Picture

Dean,

We’d love to report on your class in June. I’ll put it on my calendar right now. 

As for your questioning the credibility of the survey, if you read the story, you’d see that it was intentionally not anonymous. We don’t do that here. In fact, if you just scanned for the proper nouns in the story and the sidebar, you could see in less than 10 minutes’ time the names/schools of about 90 percent of the people who took part. Schools weren’t cherry-picked — there are 46 of them, representing 7 counties, including multiple teachers from Farmer City. 

If you’re trying to suggest bias, please stop right there. I realize smacking around journalists has become a favorite pastime of many but when you do it in a public forum and are so clearly misinformed, it deserves a public response. Frankly, it’s beneath an elected representative like yourself. 

Direct line if you’d like to hear more about the methodology or have me send you the list of names and schools: 217 351 5363

— Jeff D’Alessio, Editor

Urbana71 wrote on March 05, 2018 at 7:03 am

I publically apologize to Jeff.  He is right, I commented before I carefully studied the methodology in his article.  I'm only human and we all get a little battle fatigued from time to time.  I do not doubt Jeff's credibility or the credibility of the NG - in fact, the NG has been very good to us in the past.  I look forward to the NG covering the class and hearing first hand from the 50 plus teachers.

 

That being said, I work in rural schools every week.  The feedback I get is the opposite.  I can not speak for the Champaign/Urbana teachers, I do not work within those schools systems - but without a doubt, I have very different results from teachers located in rural areas - hence the class with 50 plus teachers and a waiting list for more.

Again, my apologies to Jeff for my not so well thought out comments. 

 

Dean Hazen

 

 

 

jparks wrote on March 05, 2018 at 10:03 pm

Jeff, thank you for responding to a post that you either believed was offensive or at least felt that it needed to receive a response.

I have a point to make but I will wait for your response to my question.

What is your opinion on gun control, trained and armed individuals in schools, and the overall condition that you think the gun control issue is in?

Thank you for your quick response to the previous poster and I respectfully anticipate the same.

CallSaul wrote on March 06, 2018 at 5:03 pm

So now you're interrogating NG editors about their stances on guns...?

Hahahahahahaha.......

Because of course only people whose opinions you've given pre approval to should even be allowed to say anything at all about the issue, amirite...?

 

wykhb wrote on March 09, 2018 at 5:03 pm

It's has long been quite evident that you are confused about how adults communicate Saul, but it's a serious stretch to suggest that you are not the record holder for posting accusatory and nonsensical attacks on the opinions of others.   

You would be a far happier person if you could just learn to mind your own business instead of being the consistent curmudgeon to any attempts at civil discourse. 

But I admit, it is rather entertaining watching you melt down so completely and publicly, sometimes the simplest entertainment is most amusing. 

CallSaul wrote on March 09, 2018 at 6:03 pm

Talk about amusing...it's always so cute when you nasty invective spewing grumpy old rightwing cranks think it's your place to lecture others about civil discourse...

...thanks for the laughs...

awp wrote on March 10, 2018 at 1:03 am

"For every arming-teachers-seems-to-work-in-some-Texas-schools argument, there is no shortage of counter-arguments."

Jeff, If this article is unbiased, as you have claimed in this comment section, then why refer to arguments in support of removing gun restrictions on public schools as 'arming-teachers-seems-to-work-in-some-Texas-schools arguments'?

And what counter-arguments? These counter-arguments?

"I personally would feel less safe knowing there was a gun in my classroom,"

"As a teacher myself, and speaking for many of my friends and colleagues, the day you try to arm us is the day many of us find new professions."

I find it strange that we do not apply the same logic to everything else precious to us. Guns protect our politicians, celebrities, police, and money, but for some reason they cannot protect our children?

98.4% of the mass shootings throughout the last 65 years have occured in gun free zones. Is it not foolish to provide wannabe mass murderers with such a guarantee? Is this statistic not significant?

gun-free = vulnerable
 

"And what if, in a frantic situation, a gun-carrying teacher is mistaken by law enforcement as the shooter, says Uni High Japanese instructor Mari Porter."

This is irrational. Presumably, guns would only be drawn in the event an intruder is actively murdering children. In this scenario, faculty are clearly at greater risk of getting shot by said intruder than accidentally by the police. While anomolies are bound to occur, the risk far outweighs cost. Besides, can faculty not simply coordinate with law enforcement? Can faculty not simply be provided with emergency radios so that these risks can be avoided altogether?

"Is the NRA going to suggest we arm students next?"

"Whoever thought of this must have never worked in a classroom full of children."

These are not arguments.

"We work hard to keep many things out of our schools that are dangerous to students, like cigarettes, asbestos and bleach, so it would be counter-intuitive to allow people to bring in the one thing that is blatantly dangerous to our students — guns,"

This is a fallacious statement. Apparently, intruders are entering schools and murdering dozens of children at a time. But you are right, since we have banned asbestos, we should just let mass-murderers kill unabated.

"If we don't allow guns on planes or in courthouses, then we should not allow guns in schools."

But we do allow guns on planes and courthouses. Courthouses are probably some of the most heavily armed facilities in existence, and for good reason.

"During a state teacher shortage, would we even have enough teachers willing to participate in this extra duty?"

Outsource it.

"To throw this responsibility on top of the mountain of everything we do is honestly insulting,"

Why would this be a responsibility undertaken by teachers who do not with to participate?

"They [students] could overpower (a teacher) and have access to a weapon that they might not have otherwise had..."

Sure, this seems like a valid argument to me. We should take this into account, but there is no reason to place much stock into it. Chicago has some of the strictest gun laws in the country, yet guns are readily available to criminals who wish to obtain them. We could use gun safes, or as mentioned by others, skip arming teachers altogether and hire security, or place armed law enforcement at the entrances to our schools.

"I think it would also desensitize the kids to guns and make it seem normal to carry weapons at work"

Sounds familar. Wasn't this argument made about violent video games as well? Remember how that turned out?

"Teachers with weapons would create an adversarial overtone that would be harmful in producing meaningful, impactful relationships," he says. "Many kids that I taught in Rantoul saw the police as adversaries. If I had carried a gun while in school, I would not have been able to make bonds with some of those kids. In the end, it would have hurt my ability to teach."

Nobody is proposing turning teachers into some kind of militant enforcers. Guns should not be visible or pulled out unless there is an urgent need to.

I agree that we should first exhaust any and all preventative measures available to us, but the 'counter arguments' provided have not persuaded me to be on board with gun-free zones. In fact, the 'counter-arguments' provided are so poor, that (regretfully) the following might be in our best interest:

"Urbana music teachers April Blacker and Roberta Westerman say that would be enough to make them quit the profession altogether — and they wouldn't be alone."
 

No disrespect intended, I read the News Gazette every day, but surely this topic is worthy of a more intellectully honest discussion.

Rick Noble wrote on March 04, 2018 at 10:03 pm

I don't think this is a non biased article.  I find the numbers out of line with what I am hearing.  I have talked to several teachers and the majority of the ones I have talked to are ok with arming teachers that WANT to be armed.  No where will it be mandated that  teachers be armed.

I am a retired police officer and a concealed carry instructor.  I am also an active shooter insructor and conduct seminars for churches and private businesses on active shooter training. 

In antipation of the law banning guns in schools changing, my partner Dean Hazen and myself have offered a FREE concealed carry class to teachers in the local area.  We have over 60 signed up at this time.

I would like to see the NG cover both sides of this.  Feel free to contact me. 

Rick Noble

 

 

 

Dread Pirate DNT wrote on March 05, 2018 at 7:03 am
Profile Picture

Profiteering off dead kids. Nice.

wykhb wrote on March 09, 2018 at 5:03 pm

Hello CallDeadPirateSaul,  yes indeed the Democratic party and the media are taking full advantage of dead children to advance their agendas, and have been for a long time.  This is the reason they are unwilling to entertain the notion of citizens being allowed legally to defend themselves against the products of Liberal Democratic Policy in the USA.   Thank you for your concern, and your support of action rather than the empty words of the past several decades.

cjw61822@hotmail.com wrote on March 04, 2018 at 11:03 pm

Last fatal school fire?

Over 50 years ago

 

last Chicago school shooting  (inside the building) ?

20 + years ago.  Chicago PO died keeping an attacker from entering the building.  She died keeping the students safe and her partner killed the suspect.

 

https://www.odmp.org/officer/11612-police-officer-irma-c-ruiz

 

Why?

Metal detectors and armed police officers at the door when school is open.

 

As the teacher from Uni put it, chances are when responding officers enter a building and they see a teacher with a gun, chances are the teacher is going to get shot.  Arming teachers is not the answer.

Making it hard to get into the school is the answer.

 

Schools need to have the same safety upgrades for attack as they did for fires.  You cannot have open doors, poor communication and the endless open the door to outsiders and hope that they go to the office rather than wandering around the building.

 

The kid in Florida was a known menace yet none of this classmates reported to anyone that he was in the building?

CallSaul wrote on March 05, 2018 at 1:03 am

This is a flamingly lunatic idea put forth by idiot keyboard kommandos and delusional fantasist with no actual combat or law enforcement experience...

If this rightwing fantasy wild west shoot em up Walter Mitty idiocy is actually put in place, it's just a short matter of time before some Rambo wannabe trigger happy maniac teacher murders a student...

...and what happens then...?

wykhb wrote on March 09, 2018 at 5:03 pm

I see people are avoiding you Saul, I will say hi before I hit the flush lever on you as usual however.  Why don't you relate what actual combat or law enforcement experience YOU have?  In fact, I would like to see you relate ANY experience other than being an anonymous keyboard coward lickspittle serving in the slave army of your liberal masters who spread terrorism, mayhem, and mass murder across the globe.

Instead of asking "what if", why don't you use your vast expertise to detail what should happen NOW to stop what is occurring, go ahead, TAKE A POSITION for once.    Right, I know that idea is ludicrous.

Standing by for maniacal ranting nonsensical tantrum below:  Tick Tock, Tick Tock, Tick Tock....

CallSaul wrote on March 09, 2018 at 6:03 pm

Hahahahahahaha....

You RWNJs sure do have a hard time grasping the concept of how to ignore someone, don't you...?

Hint: it's a lot more effective if you don't keep obsessing over and stalking the person you're attempting to ignore.

And I see you're keeping up your scatalogical fetish. You do you, dude...(just make sure to wash those nasty hands of yours)....

And such a lack of civil discourse...for shame and tut tut and tsk tsk tsk...

Oh yah, but of course...it's only people who dare to disagree with you that must 'be civil.' You and the other lunatic rightwing extremist reactionary delusional nutjobs can be as nasty and hateful and filled with resentment and jealousy as you please, right...?

And please keep up your delusional rightwing rantings about my 'liberal masters who spread terrorism, mayhem, and mass murder across the globe'...

Such kookiness really does make for a good laugh at the end of the day...

byrdslover wrote on March 05, 2018 at 5:03 pm

this is a great idea.  i support everything.

chief21 wrote on March 06, 2018 at 4:03 pm

My grandson's Math teacher is an Arghanistan veteran with combat experience. If a lunatic is slowly coming down the hall picking off school children, do you think I would want an Army Veteran to have a weapon? Yes, Yes, and Yes. Why sit patiently for a gunshot? Again...put down the hysteria card...no one is asking every, single teacher to bear a weapon. ALso.....why not give a taser weapon to a teacher? No weapon in schools......you got NO CHANCE.

awp wrote on March 10, 2018 at 1:03 am

"For every arming-teachers-seems-to-work-in-some-Texas-schools argument, there is no shortage of counter-arguments."

Jeff, If this article is unbiased, as you have claimed in this comment section, then why refer to arguments in support of removing gun restrictions on public schools as 'arming-teachers-seems-to-work-in-some-Texas-schools arguments'?

And what counter-arguments? These counter-arguments?


"I personally would feel less safe knowing there was a gun in my classroom,"

"As a teacher myself, and speaking for many of my friends and colleagues, the day you try to arm us is the day many of us find new professions."

I find it strange that we do not apply the same logic to everything else precious to us. Guns protect our politicians, celebrities, police, and money, but for some reason they cannot protect our children?

gun-free = vulnerable

98.4% of the mass shootings throughout the last 65 years have occured in gun free zones. Is it not foolish to provide wannabe mass murderers with such a guarantee? Is this statistic not significant?
 

"And what if, in a frantic situation, a gun-carrying teacher is mistaken by law enforcement as the shooter, says Uni High Japanese instructor Mari Porter."
 

This is irrational. Presumably, guns would only be drawn in the event an intruder is actively murdering children. In this scenario, faculty are clearly at greater risk of getting shot by said intruder than accidentally by the police. While anomolies are bound to occur, the risk far outweighs cost. Besides, can faculty not simply coordinate with law enforcement? Can faculty not simply be provided with emergency radios so that these risks can be avoided altogether?

"Is the NRA going to suggest we arm students next?"

"Whoever thought of this must have never worked in a classroom full of children."

These are not arguments.
 

"We work hard to keep many things out of our schools that are dangerous to students, like cigarettes, asbestos and bleach, so it would be counter-intuitive to allow people to bring in the one thing that is blatantly dangerous to our students — guns,"
 

This is a fallacious statement. Apparently, intruders are entering schools and murdering dozens of children at a time. But you are right, since we have banned asbestos, we should just let mass-murderers kill unabated.
 

"If we don't allow guns on planes or in courthouses, then we should not allow guns in schools."
 

But we do allow guns on planes and courthouses. Courthouses are probably some of the most heavily armed facilities in existence, and for good reason.

"During a state teacher shortage, would we even have enough teachers willing to participate in this extra duty?"

If not, just outsource it.
 

"To throw this responsibility on top of the mountain of everything we do is honestly insulting,"
 

Why would this be a responsibility undertaken by teachers who do not with to participate?

"They [students] could overpower (a teacher) and have access to a weapon that they might not have otherwise had..."

Sure. We should take this into account, but there is no reason to place much stock into it. Chicago has some of the strictest gun laws in the country, yet guns are readily available to criminals who wish to obtain them. We could use gun safes, or as mentioned by others, skip arming teachers altogether and hire security, or place armed law enforcement at the entrances to our schools.

"I think it would also desensitize the kids to guns and make it seem normal to carry weapons at work"

Sounds familar. Wasn't this argument made about violent video games as well? Remember how that turned out?

"Teachers with weapons would create an adversarial overtone that would be harmful in producing meaningful, impactful relationships," he says. "Many kids that I taught in Rantoul saw the police as adversaries. If I had carried a gun while in school, I would not have been able to make bonds with some of those kids. In the end, it would have hurt my ability to teach."

Presumably, guns would only be drawn in the event an intruder is actively murdering children. This should be strictly enforced. Nobody is proposing turning teachers into some kind of militant enforcers. 

I agree that we should first exhaust any and all preventative measures available to us, but the 'counter arguments' provided have not persuaded me to be on board with gun-free zones. In fact, the 'counter-arguments' provided are so poor, that (regretfully) the following might be in our best interest: "Urbana music teachers April Blacker and Roberta Westerman say that would be enough to make them quit the profession altogether — and they wouldn't be alone."

No disrespect intended, I read the News Gazette every day, but surely this topic is worthy of a more intellectully honest discussion.

jparks wrote on March 07, 2018 at 8:03 pm

That is your definition of an interrogation?  One question?  Thanks dectective.  Keep putting up those hallway paintings.  That will learn them.

Apparently it was one question too many and one question too difficult for Jeff to answer.

jparks wrote on March 07, 2018 at 8:03 pm

Sorry, this didn't show up where I intended.

My point is the same.

Based on the interviews he conducted, Jeff could have titled the story.."Teachers feel carrying guns in schools will deter future school shootings."

He chose not to.  Headlines often lead readers to think certain ways.  How you phrase questions can often influence answers. 

I still like the idea of more hallway paintings.  I hope the frames are made of steel so victims can hit the shooters over the head with them.  Brilliant.  This person is teaching our children.

wykhb wrote on March 09, 2018 at 5:03 pm

Kevlar wall paintings...   You Sir, may have a great idea here.  I would go further and suggest that school districts hire former Democrat politicians to defend students with vague rhetoric, media gotcha zingers, and finger paintings of their great legislative accomplishments.   They have to be good at something if they aren't qualified to clean toilets?

GeneralLeePeeved wrote on March 08, 2018 at 2:03 pm

Sure hope they hand out some white hats for those "good guys" with guns to wear

Common Sense wrote on March 09, 2018 at 11:03 am

It's nice to see we can count on Call to parrot the same crap we heard from idiots years ago when concealed carry was allowed. There were going to be murders on the street, wild west shoot-outs just because people were carrying guns. I guess we'll have to point out to him that in the four years since then, there have been no, that is zero, such incidents in Illinois, and for the most part the entire country. Does that keep him and others like him from once again giving us  the same old tired line?

Apparently not.

wykhb wrote on March 09, 2018 at 4:03 pm

Saul is mentally ill, we aren't allowed to hold that person accountable for any of the trash it spews endlessly because it doesn't meet the IQ level of functional adult. 

awp wrote on March 10, 2018 at 1:03 am

@common sense
 
"I guess we'll have to point out to him that in the four years since then, there have been no, that is zero, such incidents in Illinois"

So far in 2018, Chicago alone has already seen 401 victims of gun violence and 90 homicides.

Have you lost your mind?

Oh, wait. Those were all illegally obtained weapons...

CallSaul wrote on March 10, 2018 at 1:03 pm

We all know actual facts and reality are unimportant to the NRA leadership and their loyal gun extremist foot soldiers --- which is of course why their bought and paid for stooges in the GOP passed and keep protecting the law making it illegal for the CDC to collect data on gun deaths that also make it extremely difficult for anyone else to do so too --- but here are a few quotes from and about teachers on the ground in red states that actually reflect the beliefs of the majority of Americans:

'Most North Carolina educators think it’s a bad idea to let teachers carry guns in the classroom, and they say arming teachers would make schools less safe and harm the learning environment, according to a newly released poll.' 

'“Look, I don’t want to die, and I don’t want to kill anyone,” said Leigh Sanders, a sixth-grade English teacher at Swift Creek Middle School in Johnston County. “I want to teach, and if anyone wants to arm teachers, please for the love of country, let it be with school supplies, nurses, counselors and, above all else, trust.”'

http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/education/article204023969.html

And:

'The Legislature's new plan to arm school employees as a last line of defense to an active shooter might never get tested in Florida's biggest school districts.'

'Officials in 10 of the state's largest systems, which educate nearly 60 percent of all Florida school children, said they have no intention of giving teachers or other staff guns to carry into classrooms.'

'"I believe the people carrying weapons should be law enforcement officers and not our employees," said Seminole County school superintendent Walt Griffin, echoing comments of his large-district peers. "I do not support our hard-working teachers having the responsibility of carrying a weapon."'

http://www.tampabay.com/florida-politics/buzz/2018/03/08/floridas-bigges...

See Red state teachers courageously defy GOP on guns in the classroom for more: https://shareblue.com/arming-teachers-trump-nra-guns-in-schools/

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