With the 2018 primary in the books, it's on to November

With the 2018 primary in the books, it's on to November

T-minus 244 days until it's back to the polls for the general election. A quick review of Tuesday's primary before we turn our attention to November:

WINNERS

1.

Rantoul High's Class of '86. In the past nine months, alums have been tabbed village police chief (Tony Brown, the first native to hold the position since Allen Jones Sr.) and presumed Champaign County sheriff (Jones' son, Allen Jr., the winner of Tuesday night's GOP primary). They've come a long way since high school — in many respects. As Jones joked Wednesday, he was "seriously rocking the mullet" back then.

2.

The diversity cause. How times have changed: In 1990, Centralia native Roland Burris became just the second African-American elected attorney general of any state. Come November, two will duke it out for the job Lisa Madigan is leaving — Urbana's Erika Harold for the Republicans, Chicago's Kwame Raoul for the Dems.

3.

Bement Elementary (est. 1899). With big changes coming to Monticello's Washington Elementary (est. 1894) and a total makeover in the works at Champaign's Dr. Howard Elementary (est. 1910), the Piatt County school is in a league of its own in our area. Despite opening in the 19th century, it's in tip-top shape and "filled with beauty from that time period of construction," Bement Superintendent Sheila Greenwood says.

LOSERS

1.

The I-Can't-Take-Another-Political-Ad crowd. A gubernatorial matchup that's good news for TV stations' bottom line — J.B. Pritzker (worth more than Michael Jordan and Roger Penske combined, per Forbes) vs. Bruce Rauner ($91 million in state taxable income in 2016, per his Form 1040) — could lead to a statewide run on DVR machines. For last week alone, the two campaigns spent $71,070 for 146 spots to run on WCIA alone, according to FCC filings.

2.

Opponents of marijuana legalization. In 2016, voters in the City of Champaign and Cunningham townships gave thumbs up to an advisory question that asked whether Illinois should join Colorado in legalizing pot. On Tuesday, 68.2 percent of Cook County voters said yes to a similar question. Advisory questions are nonbinding, but the votes could lead legislators to act in the months ahead.

3.

Newspaper editorial boards. Of the biggies, only the Sun-Times went 2-for-2 in endorsed gubernatorial candidates winning. Among the newspapers that hit .500, backing Chris Kennedy: this one, the Tribune and those in Arlington Heights, Peoria and Springfield. The Bloomington and Decatur papers both backed Daniel Biss.

Sections (2):News, Local
Tags (1):election 2018
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