Columns

Columns

Dan Corkery: Learning the fine art of editorial cartoons

Whether it's the pompous presidential candidate, the sententious senator or the rambling representative, someone has to keep them humble.

In steps the editorial cartoonist.

Equal parts jester and artist, the cartoonist has a tricky job. He has just seconds to connect with his readers.

Trumping his own convention

By Donna Brazile

Jim Nowlan: Illinois could lower pension contribution

A thoughtful friend of mine has an idea that would fully fund Illinois pension obligations — and save more than $2 billion a year in state spending.

The state of Illinois will appropriate $9 billion this year, and each year far into the future, for pension funding. This is fully 28 percent of all state general funds revenue of about $32 billion.

Donna Brazile: The new way ... holding on to hope

By Donna Brazile 

My heart is full as I continue to grieve for Seth Rich, shot by an unknown assailant as he walked to his Washington, D.C., home in the early morning on the Lord's Day. Seth was my colleague at the Democratic National Committee. He worked on one of democracy's highest callings, registering citizens to vote and helping them find their polling place.

Dan Corkery: 'Pay as you go': Advice for today's leaders

The state of Illinois began this month with nearly $8 billion in unpaid bills. A year from now, the deadbeat's tab could grow to $10 billion, according to the comptroller's office.

Perhaps we could use a latter-day Paul Simon.

While known as a liberal Democrat, the late senator was also a champion for a balanced-budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

George Will: GOP minds are at sea — but not the right one

WASHINGTON — Neither the unanimous decision by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, nor China's rejection of it, was surprising. The timing of it was, however, as serendipitous as China's rejection is ominous.

Sundiata Cha-Jua/Real Talk: 'Repression breeds resistance'

History, unlike the natural sciences, has few scientific laws. In 1967, Huey P. Newton, leader of the Black Panther Party, identified one historical law when he said, "Repression breeds resistance." Newton understood that oppressed people constantly challenge their oppression, most often in individualistic disorganized and episodic acts.

Jim Dey: This should be a big week in maps movement

The caller posed a question with some urgency. She's been seeing television advertisements for the proposed state constitutional amendment that would end legislative gerrymandering in Illinois.

Does that mean, she asked, that the question has the required legal clearance to be placed on the ballot for the Nov. 7 election?

George Will: Tenure benefits teachers, not students

LOS ANGELES — The mills of justice grind slowly, but life plunges on, leaving lives blighted when justice, by being delayed, is irremediably denied. Fortunately, California's Supreme Court might soon decide to hear — four years after litigation began — the 21st century's most portentous civil rights case, which concerns an ongoing denial of equal protection of the law.

Jim Dey: Fines just tip of courthouse iceberg

At first blush, it might look as if a McLean County defendant who was convicted of driving under the influence got a break — a mere $150 fine.

But that was just the tip of an iceberg of a bill — officials added another $1,742 in special assessments.