Education

Education

School walk will promote student wellness

CHAMPAIGN – Almost as soon as children are back in the classroom each fall, parents are circulating fundraising catalogs to friends, family and co-workers. Sales of magazine subscriptions, wrapping paper and candy help pay for many activities for students.

Westview Elementary School is trying something different this year. Instead of the usual fall fundraiser, the school is holding a walk. Children are asking for donations, and students, staff, parents and others will walk a quarter-mile course around the school Friday morning.

State education board values teen perspective

URBANA – Even before they've received their high school diploma, two University Laboratory High School students have earned seats at a very important table.

Micah Berman and Ranny Ma are two of only 15 students statewide selected to be part of the Illinois State Board of Education's Student Advisory Council – where they'll literally sit at the board's table, talking about all things education.

Trustees to mull adding speakers for emergencies

DANVILLE – Danville Area Community College students Abigail Cox and Michael Howard said they feel safe on the small campus.

But they commended DACC officials for wanting to boost safety further by installing emergency notification speakers, which would alert them to any problems.

Extra summer vacation would come at a cost

RANTOUL – Classes might start later in Rantoul elementary schools – but students might have to give up spring break to do it.

Superintendent Bill Trankina recommended Thursday that Rantoul City School district board members consider a significant change in the district's annual schedule.

Officials give co-op schools thumbs down

CERRO GORDO – Cerro Gordo school officials have decided a co-op high school isn't a viable reorganization option.

At Thursday's meeting, Superintendent Brett Robinson reported on a meeting last week with representatives from a reorganization studies firm and superintendents from the Atwood-Hammond, Lovington and Bement school districts.

Parkland students, staff return day after water scare

CHAMPAIGN – Parkland College students and faculty members returned to business as usual today, a day after a scare that prompted officials to announce they would close the college until Monday.

"There are a lot of students in the hall, the parking lots are filling up and it's looking like everyone is back," said Jody Littleton, executive director of community relations. "We got a positive response from the faculty."

Champaign school district health care gets shot in the arm

CHAMPAIGN – When it comes to helping children with medical conditions in the Champaign school district, it falls on principals, deans and student services coordinators to give medications or know how to give an epinephrine injection in the case of an allergic reaction.

But now those administrators have someone to turn to with questions about handling a situation correctly or providing medication at the appropriate time. The district has a school nurse for the first time in more than a decade – Valerie Day, a registered nurse who started work in mid-August and is based at Stratton Elementary School.

Hoopeston meetings to rotate throughout district

HOOPESTON – The Hoopeston school board shook things up a bit at Thursday's meeting with a change of venue for several upcoming meetings.

Normally all board meetings are held at the Hoopeston High School library, but this school year, meetings will be at each of the school buildings.

Parkland will be open Friday after water contamination issue

CHAMPAIGN – After saying earlier today that it would close its campus until Monday because of a water contamination problem, Parkland College announced it will be open Friday and follow a normal schedule.

Illinois American Water declared the school's water supply to be safe on Thursday afternoon. The Illinois Department of Public Health notified college officials about noon Thursday that the school's water system was contaminated.

Sparking interest in agriculture

URBANA – In a classroom of Urbana High School, senior John Crain touched his tongue to one connector on the top of a small battery, waiting for a reaction.

Nothing.