Health and Fitness

Health and Fitness

Medicare project may include Carle

URBANA – Carle Foundation Hospital may be one of eight medical sites in the country that would help coordinate the care of Medicare patients who suffer from multiple chronic illnesses.

Under legislation sponsored by U.S. Rep. Tim Johnson, R-Urbana, Carle and the other health care institutions would develop and test coordinated care strategies for Medicare patients with such ailments as heart disease and diabetes.

Hospital offers less-invasive breast biopsies

DANVILLE – Provena United Samaritans Medical Center has begun using a minimally invasive biopsy procedure to diagnose possible breast cancer.

The hospital is now using a vacuum-assisted core needle device that allows for more accurate diagnosis than other needle biopsy procedures provide. And because the procedure requires only a quarter-inch incision in the breast and can be done under local anesthesia, patients recover faster and with less pain and scarring than those undergoing a surgical biopsy, hospital officials said.

County plans to contest $50,000 state fine

URBANA – Champaign County could have to pay a $50,000 fine for paperwork violations in connection with repairs to the ventilation system in its $24 million nursing home, which had been plagued with mold.

The county plans to ask for a hearing to contest the fine.

Hot dog: Rose wins online pet contest

Rose is a hot dog – a prize-winning one at that.

Rose, a terrier-beagle mix adopted by University of Illinois veterinary medicine student Jeannie Harrison, is one of two grand prize winners in the Hill's Science Diet Second Chance for Love contest. The other grand prize winner was a cat by the name of Jake. With the win, Hill's will donate $10,000 to the animal shelters nominated by the owners of the two pets. The winners also get a five-year supply of pet food.

Ornaments to be sold as hospice fundraiser

URBANA – The hospice program that serves the Provena hospitals in Urbana and Danville is selling collectible ornaments for the holidays to raise money for its grief-support group services.

The hospice service plans to make this year's ornament – a star symbol – the first in a series with a new one to be released every year.

It's your business: A harvest of art at Farmers Market

Diane and Brian Farmer are putting their artistic sides to work in a brand new store they've opened in Rantoul called The Farmers Market.

The merchandise includes Diane Farmer's lotions, perfumes and massage oils which she also custom-blends for customers from more than 300 scents she has available.

Drug discount card available to Vermilion residents

DANVILLE – If insurance doesn't cover the cost of prescription drugs or someone has no insurance, then a free prescription-discount card made available through Vermilion County government offers average discounts of 20 percent on the price of drugs.

The cards are made available for free to any Vermilion County resident, through a partnership with the National Association of Counties and Caremark, a national pharmaceutical service provider that merged earlier this year with the CVS pharmacy chain.

Stepping up in fight against arthritis

CHAMPAIGN – It's become an early December tradition for students, families and staff from Bottenfield Elementary School. They'll get together Sunday afternoon for a run or walk around Centennial Park during the Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis.

They should be in shape for it. Bottenfield has a Mileage Club, created by PE teacher Wendy Huckstadt, which encourages kids to be active at school and at home. Students run on a course marked out around the school grounds during PE, and they can also run at recess or at home. They collect plastic feet to be worn on a chain for every 5 miles they run.

Mercury instruments collected in cleanup

CHAMPAIGN – One of Von Young's priorities Thursday: collect all mercury-containing instruments at Parkland College to turn over to hazmat crews already working there.

Young, Parkland's chief of police, was one of the first people notified, at about noon Wednesday, about a mercury spill from an old, broken blood pressure cuff in a health professions classroom, and he said officials Thursday made sure it won't happen again.

World AIDS Day: Local health officials stress prevention

CHAMPAIGN – People infected with HIV are living longer these days, but health officials say the crucial message about prevention is still falling on too many deaf ears.

Some young people think the new medicines for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, are now so much better that it won't matter if they become infected, says Dr. Stephen Dolan, an infectious disease doctor at the Carle HIV Clinic.