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Once again, Sunday offered a break from news of double-digit newly confirmed COVID-19 cases in Champaign County.

After six straight days of 20-plus cases, just five were added to Champaign County's total Sunday, raising it to 552.

It's been a familiar storyline: For the past six Sundays combined, 19 new cases have been reported by the C-U Public Health District.

Of the county's 552 cases, 311 are considered recovered and 234 are active. Four residents remained hospitalized.

All five new cases were reported in Urbana — three in the 61802 ZIP code, two in 61801.

An updated rundown of cases by ZIP code, according to C-U Public Health data, which doesn't distinguish between active and recovered:

— 61866/Rantoul: 143 (no change from Saturday)

— 61821/Champaign: 100 (no change from Saturday)

— 61820/Champaign: 94 (no change from Saturday)

— 61802/Urbana: 75 (up three from Saturday)

— 61822/Champaign: 46 (no change from Saturday)

— 61801/Urbana: 40 (up two from Saturday)

— 61874/Savoy: 15 (no change from Saturday)

— 61853/Mahomet: 12 (no change from Saturday)

— 60949/Ludlow: 6 (no change from Saturday)

— 61863/Pesotum: 5 (no change from Saturday)

— 61873/St. Joseph: 4 (no change from Saturday)

— 61880/Tolono: 4 (no change from Saturday)

— 61849/Homer: 2 (no change from Saturday)

— 61878/Thomasboro: 2 (no change from Saturday)

— 61843/Fisher: 1 (no change from Saturday)

— 61847/Gifford: 1 (no change from Saturday)

— 61862/Penfield: 1 (no change from Saturday)

— 61877/Sidney: 1 (no change from Saturday)

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FORD COUNTY ADDS ONE CASE

A man in his 30s is the 21st resident to test positive for COVID-19 in Ford County, the local health department announced Sunday.

Five of the 21 remain in isolation; 15 have been released.

One Ford County resident died previously from COVID-19, officials said.

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STATE RELEASES REOPENING GUIDELINES

With all four regions of the state on track to advance Friday to Phase 3 of Gov. J.B. Pritzker's Restore Illinois plan, the state released new industry-specific guidelines for businesses set to reopen in some capacity, including barbershops, salons, restaurants and bars.

“In every aspect of our pandemic response, and especially as we begin to safely reopen meaningful swaths of our economy, our number one priority must be the health and safety of our workers, our customers and Illinoisans at large,” Pritzker said in a statement.

“The industry-specific baseline guidance for businesses the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity released today will help employers re-open their doors in Phase 3 in line with that priority. In order to cover as many unique aspects of industry as possible, my administration collected input from hundreds of industry participants across the state and these guidelines reflect the questions and ideas brought to us by businesses of every size, background, and region in the state – and prioritize public health as our guiding light.

"You can’t build a strong economy if people aren’t comfortable being a part of it.”

The detailed guidelines can be found in full on the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity website. Below are the rules and recommendations for two industries: Restaurants/bars and Personal care services, including hair salons and barbershops.

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STATE GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS: RETAIL

'Customer and Behaviors' — Minimum guidelines

1. Customers should wear face coverings over their nose and mouth (exceptions can be made for people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from safely wearing a face covering).

2. Customers should not bring reusable shopping bags into stores.

'Staffing and Attendance' — Minimum guidelines

1. Maximum of 50% of store capacity OR 5 customers allowed per 1000 sq. ft. of retail space.

2. Retailer should design a plan to allow for social distancing within the workplace and if needed, designate employee(s) to monitor capacity limits and social distancing.

3. Retailer should limit the occupancy of common areas/ break rooms to allow for social distancing of 6-ft or greater by removing/decommissioning furniture or staggering break times; this guideline is not intended to diminish employees break time requirements.

'Staffing and Attendance' — Encouraged best practices

1. Stagger shift start and end times to minimize congregation of employees during changeovers.

2. If practical, group employees in clusters and schedule groups on same shifts to reduce cross-team exposure.

'Physical Workspace' — Minimum guidelines

1. Retailer should display signage at entry with face covering requirements, social distancing guidelines, and cleaning protocols, in multiple languages as needed.

2. Water fountains, except for touchless water bottle refill stations, should be made unavailable for use (e.g. turned off, covered, area blocked) a. If no touchless fountain is available, water may be served in sealed, single-use water bottles.

3. Shopping mall food courts should have all indoor seating and tables removed or otherwise be made inaccessible for public use. Food court restaurants should only offer carry out or delivery service unless the Restore Illinois Outdoor Dining and Drinking Guidelines apply.

'Physical Workspace' — Encouraged best practices

1. Display visual markers 6-ft. apart at customer queue points.

2. If practical, install impermeable barrier between employee and customer at checkout.

3. If practical, implement touchless transactions.

4. Remove shared products (e.g., beauty testers) from displays.

5. Where building management practices allow, increase air turnover rates in occupied spaces and increase outside make-up air to the maximum extent practical.

'General Health' — Minimum guidelines

1. All employees who can work from home should continue to do so.

2. Employees should wear face coverings over their nose and mouth when within 6-ft. of others (cloth masks preferred). Exceptions may be made where accommodations are appropriate – see IDHR’s guidance.

3. Social distance of at least 6-ft. should be maintained between non-household individuals unless participating in activities permitted under Phase III guidelines.

4. Employer should provide hand washing capability or sanitizer to employees and if applicable, customers.

5. Frequent hand washing by employees, and an adequate supply of soap/ paper towels and/or disinfectant/ hand sanitizer should be available.

'Health monitoring' — Minimum guidelines

1. Employers should make temperature checks available for employees and encourage their use. Employers should post information about the symptoms of COVID-19 in order to allow employees to self-assess whether they have any symptoms and should consider going home.

2. All employers should have a wellness screening program. Resources outlining screening program best practices are posted on the DCEO Restore Illinois website a. Employer should conduct in-person screening of employees upon entry into workplace and mid-shift screening to verify no presence of COVID-19 symptoms.

3. If employee does contract COVID-19, they should remain isolated at home for a minimum of 10 days after symptom onset and can be released after feverless and feeling well (without fever-reducing medication) for at least 72 hours OR has 2 negative COVID-19 tests in a row, with testing done at least 24 hours apart.

4. If an employee is identified as being COVID-19 positive by testing, CDC cleaning and disinfecting should be performed as soon after the confirmation of a positive test as practical.

5. Where appropriate, notify employees who have been exposed.

6. Any employee who has had close contact1 with co-worker or any other person who is diagnosed with COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days after the last/most recent contact with the infectious individual and should seek a COVID-19 test at a state or local government testing center, healthcare center or other testing locations. All other employees should be on alert for symptoms of fever, cough, or shortness of breath and taking temperature if symptoms develop.

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STATE GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS: RESTAURANTS AND BARS

'Customer Behaviors' — Minimum guidelines

1. 6-person party limit.

2. Implement a reservation or call ahead model, if practical. All outdoor dining areas must be staffed to ensure social distancing will be maintained prior to guests being seated.

3. Customers should wait for services off premises, either outdoors and maintaining social distance of 6-ft with use of recommended face coverings or in their vehicles. Customers should be seated immediately upon entry.

4. Customers should wear face coverings over their nose and mouth while on premises, except while eating and drinking at table (exceptions can be made for people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from safely wearing a face covering).

'Customer Behaviors' — Encouraged best practices

1. Before allowing entrance, employers ask whether customer is currently exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms. If practical, employer should take customer temperature using thermometer (infrared / thermal cameras preferred, touchless thermometers permitted).

'Staffing and Attendance' — Minimum guidelines

1. Outdoor area capacity shall be determined by arranging seating to provide a minimum of six feet between tables or other designated customer service areas.

2. Employee should social distance from customers while not performing services.

3. Employer should limit the occupancy of common areas/ break rooms to allow for social distancing of 6-ft or greater by removing/decommissioning furniture or staggering break times; this guideline is not intended to diminish employees break time requirements.

4. Live music is permitted but employees and performers should follow social distancing guidelines, keeping the maximum distance possible from each other and from customers. Performers should wear face coverings where possible and the use of barriers between singers and customers and employees during the performance is strongly encouraged.

'Staffing and Attendance' — Encouraged best practices

1. If practical, alter hours of operation to adequately spread out customer traffic and allow for additional cleaning time.

2. Stagger shift start and end times to minimize congregation of employees during changeovers.

3. If practical, group employees in clusters and schedule groups on same shifts to reduce cross-team exposure.

'Physical Workspace' — Minimum guidelines

1. Employer should display signage at entry with face covering requirements, social distancing guidelines, and cleaning protocols, in multiple languages as needed.

2. Employer should configure space to allow for at least 6-ft. of distance between tables or other designated customer service areas.

3. Employees should maintain social distance to the extent possible while performing services.

4. Employer should close all open congregate areas (e.g., waiting areas).

5. Employers should close all self-service food areas (e.g., buffets, salad bars, coffee station).

6. Employers should eliminate table presets (e.g., table tents, menus, salt and pepper shakers, lemons, straws, shared condiments, etc.).

7. Employers should use single packet condiments, if possible, OR serve condiments in containers – such as a washable bowl or paper cup – that can be sanitized or disposed of after use (no shared condiments permitted).

8. Employers should use disposable silverware, if possible, OR use rolled silverware or silverware place in sleeves (employers should utilize gloves while rolling/placing in sleeves).

9. Employers should use disposable or touchless menus, if practical, or use menus that can be sanitized between each use a. If practical, QR Digital menu or app-based ordering should be used.

10. Employers should eliminate refilling customer beverages altogether and should use a new glass cleaned using proper dishwashing procedures.

11. Close all self-service beverage stations.

12. Water fountains in employee breakrooms, except for touchless water bottle refill stations, should be made unavailable for use (e.g. turned off, covered, area blocked) a. If no touchless fountain is available, water may be served in sealed, single-use water bottles.

13. Customers should handle their leftover food to be taken to-go.

14. Ensure that the area for take-out customers allows for at least 6-ft of separation from seated customers.

15. Customers should not be seated if inclement weather is forecasted.

16. In case of inclement weather or emergency while customers are outdoor dining, food should be packaged to-go and customers encouraged to leave.

'Physical Workspace' — Encouraged best practices

1. Deliver items to table on service trays to minimize hand contact.

2. Display visual markers 6-ft. apart at customer queue points.

3. Display signage at exits of restrooms to promote use of paper towel to open door for exit.

4. Display signage to promote distancing within shared restrooms.

5. Eliminate seating at bars within restaurant to the extent possible.

6. If practical, install impermeable barriers (e.g., plexiglass) from street and/or sidewalk traffic.

7. If practical, install impermeable barriers between tables.

8. If practical, install impermeable barriers in close contact areas (e.g., host stand, cashier).

9. If practical, implement touchless transactions.

10. If practical, allow one-way traffic flow in and out of restaurant to the outdoor seating area to limit any congregation.

11. Where building management practices allow, increase air turnover rates in occupied spaces and increase outside make-up air to the maximum extent practical.

'General Health' — Minimum guidelines

1. Employees should wear face coverings over their nose and mouth when within 6-ft. of others (cloth masks preferred). Exceptions may be made where accommodations are appropriate – see IDHR’s guidance.

2. Arrange seating to provide a minimum of 6-ft between tables. Use of plexiglass between tables is a best practice.

3. Employer should provide hand washing capability or sanitizer to employees and customers.

4. Bar and restaurant employees should wash hands for 20 seconds every 30 minutes, and:

a. Upon arrival to work

b. Prior to and during food preparation

c. When switching between tasks

d. Before donning gloves to work with food or clean equipment and utensils

e. After using the restroom

f. After handling soiled dishes and utensils

g. When visibly soiled

h. After coughing, sneezing, using a tissue, touching face

i. After eating or drinking

j. After smoking or vaping

k. After handling cell phone

5. An adequate supply of soap, disinfectant, hand sanitizer, and paper towels must be available.

6. Gloves should be worn by staff preparing food per pre-COVID food handling protocols, such as handling Ready to Eat (RTE) foods.

'Health Monitoring' — Minimum guidelines

1. Employers should make temperature checks available for employees and encourage their use. Employers should post information about the symptoms of COVID-19 in order to allow employees to self-assess whether they have any symptoms and should consider going home.

2. All employers should have a wellness screening program. Resources outlining screening program best practices are posted on the DCEO Restore Illinois guidelines website. Employer should conduct in-person screening of employees upon entry into workplace and mid-shift screening to verify no presence of COVID-19 symptoms.

3. If employee does contract COVID-19, they should remain isolated at home for a minimum of 10 days after symptom onset and can be released after feverless and feeling well (without fever-reducing medication) for at least 72 hours OR has 2 negative COVID-19 tests in a row, with testing done at least 24 hours apart.

4. If an employee is identified as being COVID-19 positive by testing, CDC cleaning and disinfecting should be performed as soon after the confirmation of a positive test as practical.

5. Where appropriate, notify employees who have been exposed.

6. Any employee who has had close contact2 with co-worker or any other person who is diagnosed with COVID-19 is required to quarantine for 14 days after the last/most recent contact with the infectious individual and should be encouraged to seek a COVID-19 test at a state or local government testing center, healthcare center or other testing locations. All other employees should be on alert for symptoms of fever, cough, or shortness of breath and taking temperature if symptoms develop.

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STATE GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS: PERSONAL CARE SERVICES

A look at what the state sent out Sunday regarding reopening rules for hair salons, barber shops, nail salons, spas, massage parlors, waxing centers and tattoo parlors:

'Customer Behavior' — Minimum guidelines

1. Reservation only, no walk-ins.

2. Customers should wear face coverings over their nose and mouth (exceptions can be made for people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from safely wearing a face covering).

3. If customer has COVID-19 symptoms, they should wait to enter premises until they have had no fever for at least 72 hours, other symptoms have improved, and at least 10 days have passed since their symptoms first appeared.

'Customer Behavior' — Encouraged best practices

1. If practical, customers should wait for services off premises.

2. Before allowing entrance, service provider asks whether customer is currently exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms. If practical, employer should take customer temperature using thermometer (infrared / thermal cameras preferred, touchless thermometers permitted).

'Staffing and Attendance' — Minimum guidelines

1. Maximum of 50% of capacity OR 5 customers allowed per 1000 sq. ft. of usable space. For salon suites, capacity limits should be applied within each suite.

2. Service provider employees should social distance from customers while not performing services.

3. Service provider should limit the occupancy of common areas/ break rooms to allow for social distancing of 6-ft or greater by removing/ decommissioning furniture or staggering break times; this guideline is not intended to diminish employees break time requirements.

'Staffing and Attendance' — Encouraged best practices

1. If practical, alter hours of operation to adequately spread out customer traffic and allow for additional cleaning time.

2. Stagger shift start and end times to minimize congregation of employees during changeovers.

3. If practical, group employees in clusters and schedule groups on same shifts to reduce cross-team exposure.

'Physical Workspace' — Minimum guidelines

1. Service provider should display signage at entry with face covering requirements, social distancing guidelines, and cleaning protocols, in multiple languages as needed.

2. Service provider should configure space to allow for at least 6-ft. of distance between customers.

3. Service provider employees should maintain social distance to the extent possible while performing services.

4. Service provider should remove shared items (e.g., magazines) from waiting areas and configure any seating to be 6-ft apart to allow for social distancing a. Any surfaces in waiting area (e.g., seats) touched by customers should be disinfected after use.

5. Service provider should eliminate service of all beverages.

6. Water fountains, except for touchless water bottle refill stations, should be made unavailable for use (e.g. turned off, covered, area blocked). If no touchless fountain is available, water may be served in sealed, single-use water bottles.

'Physical Workspace' — Encouraged best practices

1. Display visual markers 6-ft. apart at customer queue points.

2. If practical, install impermeable barriers between work stations.

3. If practical, implement touchless transactions.

4. Reduce number of items on surfaces to allow for easier cleaning, including any retail items available for purchase.

5. Remove shared products (e.g., beauty testers) from displays and discourage handling of display items.

6. Make hand sanitizing products available for employee and customer use.

7. Where building management practices allow, increase air turnover rates in occupied spaces and increase outside make-up air to the maximum extent practical.

'General Health' — Minimum guidelines

1. All employees who can work from home should continue to do so.

2. Employees should wear face coverings over their nose and mouth when within 6-ft. of others (cloth masks preferred). Exceptions may be made where accommodations are appropriate – see IDHR’s guidance.

3. Social distance of at least 6-ft. should be maintained between non-household individuals unless participating in activities permitted under Phase III guidelines.

4. Employer should provide hand washing capability or sanitizer to employees and if applicable, customers.

5. Frequent hand washing by employees, and an adequate supply of soap/ paper towels and/or disinfectant/ hand sanitizer should be available.

Health Monitoring' — Minimum guidelines

1. Employers should make temperature checks available for employees and encourage their use. Employers should post information about the symptoms of COVID-19 in order to allow employees to self-assess whether they have any symptoms and should consider going home.

2. All employers should have a wellness screening program. Resources outlining screening program best practices are posted on the DCEO Restore Illinois website a. Employer should conduct in-person screening of employees upon entry into workplace and mid-shift screening to verify no presence of COVID-19 symptoms.

3. If employee does contract COVID-19, they should remain isolated at home for a minimum of 10 days after symptom onset and can be released after feverless and feeling well (without fever-reducing medication) for at least 72 hours OR has 2 negative COVID-19 tests in a row, with testing done at least 24 hours apart.

4. If an employee is identified as being COVID-19 positive by testing, CDC cleaning and disinfecting should be performed as soon after the confirmation of a positive test as practical.

5. Where appropriate, notify employees who have been exposed.

6. Any employee who has had close contact1 with co-worker or any other person who is diagnosed with COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days after the last/most recent contact with the infectious individual and should seek a COVID-19 test at a state or local government testing center, healthcare center or other testing locations. All other employees should be on alert for symptoms of fever, cough, or shortness of breath and taking temperature if symptoms develop.

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PRITZKER: 'LISTENING TO THE SCIENCE AND THE DATA'

Here's Sunday afternoon's legislative recap from Jerry Nowicki, bureau chief of our Springfield-based news partner, Capitol News Illinois.

Lawmakers approved a state operating budget shortly before 2 a.m. Sunday, but despite the passage of the document, nothing about the next fiscal year is black and white.

The state is depending on a broad package providing federal monetary aid to states passing through the U.S. Congress, or, failing that, borrowing up to $5 billion from the U.S. Federal Reserve at an interest rate of approximately 3.8 percent.

“Well there's no doubt that we're going to have to revisit the budget if the federal government doesn't come through,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said when asked if the state had a plan for a revenue stream to pay back the borrowing.

“I think all 50 states are going to have to be revisiting their budgets if the federal government doesn’t come through.”

Pritzker took questions in his office at the Capitol on Sunday morning, about nine hours after the General Assembly adjourned on just its fourth day of legislative session since March 5.

The $42.8 billion budget keeps spending roughly flat from a year ago despite revenue for next year decreasing by an unknown number of billions and the potential of even further economic devastation should COVID-19 see a resurgence in the fall that coincides with a virulent flu season.

“The budget the General Assembly has sent to my desk acknowledges that massive economic disruption leads to difficult decisions,” Pritzker said.

Democrats, upon the bill’s passage, said in times of economic crisis, government needs to continue to spend instead of balancing the budget on the backs of the less fortunate.

Pritzker echoed the argument Sunday.

“There was a strong look at, you know, what could be cut,” Pritzker said. “Remember, though, this was all in the frame of a vastly increased need by families, workers, individuals all across the state.”

Republicans, however, called the budget balanced only on “a wing and a prayer.”

In House debate Saturday, Rep. Tom Demmer, R-Dixon, the GOP’s chief budget negotiator in the House, said there were billions of dollars, including some from the federal CARES Act, to be spent at Pritzker’s discretion with only limited guidance included in the budget.

“The ability for an administration to engage in emergency rulemaking and have control of more than $7 billion of state funds, with only broad strokes, broad umbrellas of programs and allocations for those dollars, I think should give members of this body pause,” Demmer said.

Rep. Gregory Harris, D-Chicago, said during debate the fact that the Legislature passed a full budget instead of a lump sum appropriation showed that it was exercising more oversight than other states were doing for their governors.

But Demmer said the governor’s emergency rulemaking track record – that he sought authority to implement misdemeanor fines for businesses disobeying his stay-at-home order – shows he didn’t earn the public’s trust when it comes to rulemaking.

“This talk about earning the authority, nobody knew a pandemic was coming,” Pritzker said when asked about Republican objections Sunday. “There’s just no way that anybody had any clue that we would be in this situation that we’re in right now.”

He said he would “do anything, give anything” to go back to a pre-COVID-19 level of normalcy.

“But here we are,” he said. “So, I think that there is a recognition anyway that we're gonna have an unusual year here.”

Asked if he would be comfortable with the authority the Legislature has afforded him being wielded by his former Gov. Bruce Rauner, a Republican, Pritzker said, “no, that’s why I ran against him and beat him.”

“I'm going to try very hard to operate, as I have by the way, with transparency, letting everybody know what we're doing and also why we're doing it. And the biggest thing is listening to the science and the data.”

In regard to transparency, Pritzker said the way this year’s budget was negotiated was not ideal. The measure and everything else passed in the four-day session was negotiated by working groups of lawmakers without official avenues for public input.

“I will say that although the public wasn't able to come in to hearings that the Legislature had, their representatives from both sides of the aisle were in fact in the working groups, it wasn't a one-sided set of working groups, there were bipartisan groups working on these things.”

Sometimes those groups sought executive branch input, sometimes they didn’t, he said.

While Republicans went into the special session calling for a vote on the governor’s Restore Illinois five-phased business reopening plan and some sort of check on his executive authority and ability to continuously extend disaster proclamations, no such vote occurred.

The closest thing to oversight was passed in a broad-ranging COVID-19 response bill that created a 14-member commission of eight Democrats and six Republicans that would work with the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity to discuss the reopening plan.

The commission would be scheduled to release its first report on the reopening plan on July 1, at which time the state could already be entering the fourth phase of the plan.

Republicans called the commission “window dressing.”

“Well, the Legislature has chosen not to be involved in many of the decisions that needed to be made by the executive branch,” Pritzker said when asked about the commission. “And I think, you know, when you think about it – That's why you have an executive branch in an emergency, I can act quickly. The executive branch can act quickly.”

While he said the General Assembly could not have met quickly enough to have input on his decisions early in the emergency effort, Pritzker said he was hoping the General Assembly would have gathered “much earlier” than last week.

On one particular measure, he said he believed the Legislature fell short. He had asked lawmakers to approve a measure allowing for monetary fines of businesses defying his stay-at-home order.

“I am very disappointed, I think it was a complete abdication of responsibility on the part of the Legislature,” he said, noting the director of the Illinois State Police asked for a measure providing such authority.

“None of us want to exercise the ability to take away someone’s license that’s been given to them by the state to do business. Nobody wants to shut down a business. What we were looking for was a way to issue a citation,” he said.

He said the state would have to “look at other mechanisms” for such enforcement, but he did not say what they are.

The governor said he is also looking at ways to implement the next phases of the plan and is considering issuing a fourth consecutive 30-day disaster proclamation.

“We want to make sure we can implement the Restore Illinois plan, and that we’re taking care that the health and safety of the people of Illinois is paramount, so we’re looking at it,” he said.

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67 FATALITIES IN EIGHT COUNTIES

The statewide death toll crept closer to 5,000 Sunday, with 67 coronavirus-related fatalities announced Sunday.

That gives Illinois 4,856 since the start of the pandemic. Only five states have reported more lives lost — New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Michigan and Pennsylvania.

The deaths spanned eight of Illinois' 102 counties:

— Coles: 1 female 60s, 1 female 90s.

— Cook: 1 female 20s, 2 males 30s, 1 female 50s, 5 males 50s, 1 female 60s, 9 males 60s, 4 females 70s, 9 males 70s, 11 females 80s, 6 males 80s, 7 females 90s, 3 males 90s.

— DuPage: 1 female 60s.

— Macon: 1 male 60s.

— Madison: 1 unknown 80s.

— McLean: 1 male 80s.

— St. Clair: 1 female 80s .

— Winnebago: 1 female 90s.

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2,508 NEW CASES HIGHEST NATIONALLY

Illinois reported a national-high 2,508 newly confirmed COVID-19 cases Sunday, raising its total to 110,304.

Only New York and New Jersey have confirmed more cases than Illinois, which have occurred in all but two of 102 counties — Edgar and Scott.

With a reported 25,674 tests reported during the past 24 hours, the rate of positive results was 9.77 percent, the second consecutive day below 10 percent.

The statewide seven-day rolling positivity rate is now 12 percent, the Illinois Department of Public Health reported.