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A judge has sentenced former Theranos executive Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani to nearly 13 years in prison for his role in the company’s blood-testing hoax — a sentence slightly longer than that given to the CEO, who was his lover and accomplice in one of Silicon Valley’s biggest scandals. Balwani was convicted in July of fraud and conspiracy connected to the company’s bogus medical technology that duped investors and endangered patients. His sentencing came less than three weeks after Elizabeth Holmes, the company’s founder and CEO, received more than 11 years in prison. The scheme has been dissected in a book, HBO documentary and award-winning TV series.

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Authorities say the person who would later kill five at a Colorado gay nightclub was on the FBI’s radar a day before being arrested for threatening to kill family members. However, agents closed out the case just weeks later. The disclosure by the FBI to The Associated Press creates a new timeline for when law enforcement was first alerted to Anderson Lee Aldrich as a potential danger. Previously it was thought Aldrich only became known to authorities after making the threat on June 18, 2021. The details of the June 17 tip aren't known.

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Authorities say the leader of a small polygamous group near the Arizona-Utah border had taken at least 20 wives and punished followers who didn't treat him as a prophet. An FBI affidavit released last Friday alleges that Samuel Bateman orchestrated sexual acts with followers and traded wives. It was filed in a case that charges three of his female followers with kidnapping children from state custody in Arizona and impeding a foreseeable prosecution. Two of the women appeared in federal court in Flagstaff on Wednesday and were ordered held. Bateman is facing state and federal charges of child abuse and tampering with evidence.

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The president of Peru was ousted by Congress and arrested on a charge of rebellion Wednesday after he sought to dissolve the legislative body and take unilateral control of the government, triggering a grave constitutional crisis. Vice President Dina Boluarte replaced Pedro Castillo and became the first female leader in the history of the republic after hours of wrangling between the legislature and the president. Boluarte, a 60--year-old lawyer, called for a political truce and the installation of a national unity government.

A shertiff says an 11-year-old western Indiana student will face juvenile charges of pointing a firearm and theft after leaving school, stealing a rifle from a nearby home and pointing the weapon at police officers. Vigo County Sheriff John Plasse said Wednesday that the boy was excused from class at Sugar Creek Consolidated Elementary School in West Terre Haute to go to a restroom Tuesday afternoon but instead left the building, Plasse says school protection officers heard gunshots from around a wooded area and field and located the boy and detained him. He says the boy pointed the gun at officers but did not fire.

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MILWAUKEE (AP) — A judge running for Wisconsin's Supreme Court as a tough-on-crime candidate gave a man convicted of attacking his wife two days to report to jail last month. The man is now charged with attempting to kill his in-laws during that window.

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A handful of centenarian survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor gathered at the scene in Hawaii to commemorate those who perished 81 years ago in the Japanese bombing. That is fewer than in recent years, when a dozen or more came to Hawaii from across the country to pay their respects at the annual remembrance ceremony. Part of the decline reflects the dwindling number of survivors as they age. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs doesn’t have statistics for how many Pearl Harbor survivors are still living. But its data show the number of World War II veterans is rapidly declining.

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German police have rounded up dozens of people including a self-styled prince, a retired paratrooper and a former judge, accusing the suspects of discussing the overthrow of the government, but leaving unclear how concrete the plans were. A German official and a lawmaker said Wednesday that investigators may have detected real plotting, drunken fantasizing, or both. Germany takes any right-wing threat extremely seriously, and thousands of police carried out pre-dawn raids across the country. A government spokesman says the group planned to violently abolish Germany's state of law and carry out an armed attack on the parliament building. A lawmaker with the Green party, part of the government, suggested the group may not have been capable.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin acknowledges that what he calls his “special military operation” in Ukraine is taking longer than expected. When asked Wednesday about how long the war is taking, he responded: “Of course, it could be a lengthy process.” Russian troops invaded Ukraine more than nine months ago and unleashed fighting that has displaced millions from their homes, and killed and injured tens of thousands of people. Putin hailed his forces' occupation of Ukrainian territories as a major achievement. He said his country’s nuclear weapons serve as a deterrent to escalation. Putin has periodically hinted at his potential use of nuclear weapons. Also, fresh signs emerged that Russian officials are strengthening border defenses.

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Raphael Warnock’s victory in swing-state Georgia gives Senate Democrats a 51-49 majority. It's a “lift,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Wednesday at the Capitol. Schumer said Democrats want to “get things done.” The extra seat ends one of the longest evenly split 50-50 Senates in modern memory. With a full majority Schumer is confident Democrats can sideline Trump-inspired Republicans and reach across the aisle for bipartisan priorities in the new year. Just to start, Senate Democrats will be able to have an easier time organizing committees and conducting routine votes over Republican objections.

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More weakness in tech stocks sent Wall Street mostly lower after another day of wobbly trading. The S&P 500 ended 0.2% lower Wednesday, its fifth straight loss. The Nasdaq, which is heavily weighted with tech companies, lost 0.5%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended just barely in the green. Treasury yields fell. Campbell Soup rose after reporting earnings and revenue that easily beat analysts' forecasts. Carvana plunged as fears grew that the online car seller could file for bankruptcy. Crude oil prices fell again. More data on inflation and consumer sentiment is due at the end of the week.

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The Justice Department’s inspector general has released its report on the 2018 beating death of notorious gangster James “Whitey” Bulger at the hands of fellow inmates at a federal prison in West Virginia. The internal watchdog finds multiple layers of management failures, widespread incompetence and flawed policies at the Bureau of Prisons. The report says at least six bureau workers should be disciplined. The 89-year-old Bulger, who also was an FBI informant, was killed in his cell hours after he arrived at the troubled West Virginia prison. The Justice Department has charged three men in the case. Bulger spent 16 years as one of America’s most wanted figures before he was captured.

More weakness in tech stocks sent Wall Street mostly lower after another day of wobbly trading. The S&P 500 ended 0.2% lower Wednesday, its fifth straight loss. The Nasdaq, which is heavily weighted with tech companies, lost 0.5%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended just barely in the green. Treasury yields fell. Campbell Soup rose after reporting earnings and revenue that easily beat analysts’ forecasts. Carvana plunged as fears grew that the online car seller could file for bankruptcy. Crude oil prices fell again. More data on inflation and consumer sentiment is due at the end of the week.

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As the Respect for Marriage Act moves toward final passage, much of the attention has been focused on the protection the law gives to same-sex couples. But the bill would also enshrine interracial marriages in federal law. That provision came as a surprise to some interracial couples who believed any legal uncertainty about their right to marry ended in 1967. That's the year the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws banning marriages between people of different races. The Respect for Marriage Act has been picking up steam since June, when the Supreme Court overturned the federal right to an abortion. The ruling sparked concern the high court could potentially overturn other precedent-setting rulings on same-sex and interracial marriages.

Wheat for Dec. rose 21.50 cents at $7.27 a bushel; Dec. corn gained 2.25 cents at $6.2775 a bushel, Dec. oats fell 4.25 cents at $3.3625 a bushel; while Jan. soybeans was up 17 cents at $14.72 a bushel.

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The Miami Dolphins quarterback at the center of the NFL's overhaul of its concussion protocols and the Ukrainian city that's home to Europe's largest nuclear plant are among this year's list of most mispronounced words. The Captioning Group, which captions and subtitles real-time events on TV, compiled the list released Wednesday. It highlights the names and terms that were most challenging for newsreaders and people on television to pronounce. In addition to Tua Tagovailoa and Zaporizhzhia, some of the other names and words on this year's list are Grammy-winning singer Adele, British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak and the Scottish capital, Edinburgh.

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Sports programs across the county are weighing whether tough coaching styles still have a place in the athletic world. The styles once embodied by legends such as Bear Bryant and Bobby Knight have fallen out of favor at a time when student-athletes demand more sensitive treatment and more individualized training. Athletes of this younger generation also possess greater personal power over their career paths, which sometimes forces coaches to accommodate them or risk losing top talent.

Scientists have discovered the oldest known DNA and used it to reveal what life was like 2 million years ago in the northern tip of Greenland. Today, it’s a barren Arctic desert. But back then it was a lush landscape of trees and vegetation with an array of animals, even the now extinct mastodon. The study published Wednesday looks at environmental DNA — bits of genetic material that organisms leave in their surroundings. By studying these tiny pieces, scientists found an unusual mix of species, with reindeer and geese perhaps living alongside mastodons.

Reducing waste while boosting recycling and reuse, known as the ‘circular economy,’ will be vital for halting the loss of nature by meeting growing demand with fewer resources and will make communities more resilient to climate change by encouraging more sustainable practices on the African continent, organizers of the World Circular Economy Forum said Wednesday. The conference, which brings together climate and economic experts as well businesses and think tanks, is being held in the Rwandan capital Kigali — the first ever in the global south.

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With many types of wildlife struggling to survive and their living space shrinking, some are finding their way to big cities. The United Nations says up to 1 million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction. Development in suburban and even rural areas is gobbling up habitat. The situation is stirring calls for “rewilding” places where wildlife thrived until driven out. Experts say cities offer many opportunities to support rewilding, such as restoring wetlands and planting flowers. In Detroit, scientists place wildlife cameras in woodsy sections of parks. They've recorded images of coyotes, foxes, raccoons and other animals that emerge mostly at night to roam and forage.

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DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Chinese leader Xi Jinping arrived in Saudi Arabia on Wednesday to attend meetings with oil-rich Gulf Arab nations crucial to his country's energy supplies as Beijing tries to revive an economy battered by its strict coronavirus measures.

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A person familiar with the deal says that Aaron Judge has agreed to return to the New York Yankees on a $360 million, nine-year contract. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the deal had not been announced. It's the largest free agent deal in baseball history. Judge will earn $40 million per season, the highest average annual payout for a position player. The contract trails only Mike Trout’s $426.5 million deal with the Los Angeles Angels and Mookie Betts’ $365 million pact with the Los Angeles Dodgers for biggest in baseball history.

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Every year, some tiny and independent video game developer studios like hold their own with the big leagues by making hit games that achieve commercial success or at least critical acclaim. Ben Esposito's latest, Neon White, is a campy twist on the first-person shooter genre. It's nominated for “Best Indie” and “Best Action” game at Thursday’s Game Awards, an Oscars-like event for the video game industry. How long these “indie” studios can flourish is up for debate as the gaming industry undergoes increasing consolidation. That's symbolized by Xbox-maker Microsoft’s pending $69 billion takeover of giant game publisher Activision Blizzard.

Basic services like electricity and telecoms have been restored to key parts of Ethiopia’s Tigray region following the signing of a cease-fire deal a month ago, but most areas are still cut off from the world. The agreement signed Nov. 2 requires Ethiopia’s federal government to restore basic services to Tigray, which has been mostly without phone, internet and banking services since war erupted two years ago. Power supply has also been disrupted to the region of more than 5 million people. The director of Mekele’s Ayder hospital confirms that the city has had “uninterrupted” electricity since Tuesday evening.

Friction has been simmering within the global Anglican Communion for many years over its 42 provinces’ sharp differences on whether to recognize same-sex marriage and ordain LGBTQ clergy. This year, the divisions have widened, as conservative bishops – notably from Africa and Asia – have affirmed their opposition to LGBTQ inclusion. They are demanding “repentance” by the provinces with inclusive policies — such as the Episcopal Church in the United States. Caught in the middle of the fray is the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, the top bishop of the Church of England and ceremonial leader of the Anglican Communion. He has acknowledged deep disagreement among the provinces and is urging them not to split apart.

Wall Street futures edged lower Wednesday ahead of new employment and wholesale price data with the Federal Reserve gauging its next step in its fight to cool inflation. Futures for the Dow Jones Industrials slipped 0.4% and the S&P 500 fell 0.7% just over an hour before the opening bell. Stronger-than-expected economic data this week has dragged U.S. markets lower on the expectation that the Federal Reserve will be forced to remain aggressive with interest rates during its last policy meeting of 2022. This week, the Dow has fallen 2.4%, the S&P 3.2%, and the tech-heavy Nasdaq composite nearly 4%.